29 Nov

ABL: Alab Pilipinas survives Chong Son in OT

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH CHONG SON KUNG FU 91 – McKinney 25, Howard 25, Tucker 24, Tiongson 11, Kamiran 6, Liu 0, He 0, Zhao 0, Luo 0.Quarters: 18-24, 39-47, 62-65, 84-84, 94-91. It was only the second win at home for Alab as it improved to 7-4.Howard led Chong Son with 25 points and 18 rebounds, while Fil-Am MicKinney also got 25 markers, nine assists, and six boards in his first game in Philippine soil.The Kung Fu suffered only their second loss and fell to 6-2.The Scores:TANDUAY ALAB PILIPINAS 94 – Parks 31, Brownlee 20, Balkman 20, Urbiztondo 9, Domingo 8, Maierhofer 6, Celiz 0, Hontiveros 0, Javelona 0.ADVERTISEMENT Pistons’ Blake Griffin says he wants to be where he’s wanted John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Read Next LATEST STORIES Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netTanduay Alab Pilipinas bucked gaffe late in regulation and scored a 94-91 overtime squeaker over Chong Son Kung Fu Wednesday in the 2018 ASEAN Basketball League at Sta. Rosa Multi-purpose Complex.The home team needed huge defensive stops, with Renaldo Balkman securing a huge deflection of Kamiran Sidikejiang’s pass in the clutch to deny the visitors a chance to score before Justin Brownlee sealed the three-point win.ADVERTISEMENT Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers MOST READ Reigning ABL Local MVP Bobby Ray Parks had his best game of the season, finishing with 31 points on 11-for-18 shooting clip, on top of six rebounds and two assists while handling bulk of the defensive load guarding Chong Son Heritage import Mikh McKinney.Brownlee also overcame his woeful 7-of-27 shooting night and wound up with 20 markers and 11 rebounds, while Balkman poured five of his 20 points in the extra period, while also hauling down 16 boards and six blocks.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutJosh Urbiztondo was instrumental in Alab’s late fightback from 11 points down, catching fire in the fourth period as he drained three consecutive treys to put his side up, 82-80 with 1:35 left in regulation.However, it was his errant pass to Brownlee in the final 15 seconds that allowed the Chinese club to stay alive as Justin Howard tied the game at 84. Brownlee missed the desperation three as the game went to overtime. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa View commentslast_img read more

24 Oct

Coalition for Tobacco Control Concerned About Smokers in Low-Income Category

first_imgStory Highlights Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday, May 31, which was observed as World No Tobacco Day, JCTC Board member, Deborah Chen, explained that the majority of Jamaican tobacco users are from the lower socio-economic group. “The persons who are buying the cigarettes are those who can ill afford it, and this is where the economic issues become a major concern. If you smoke a pack a day (using the average going price for different brands of cigarettes) you will spend about $360,000 a year on cigarettes, if you smoke 20 per day. If you buy them by the stick, then it will be more than the $360,000,” she outlined. The Jamaica Coalition for Tobacco Control (JCTC) is concerned about the debilitating effects of tobacco on persons from low-income households using it.Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday, May 31, which was observed as World No Tobacco Day, JCTC Board member, Deborah Chen, explained that the majority of Jamaican tobacco users are from the lower socio-economic group.According to Mrs. Chen, who is also Executive Director of the Heart Foundation of Jamaica, 20 per cent of persons who only attained a primary education smoke.This, she said, is in stark contrast to the 14 per cent of persons with secondary education and six per cent of individuals who attained tertiary training.“The persons who are buying the cigarettes are those who can ill afford it, and this is where the economic issues become a major concern. If you smoke a pack a day (using the average going price for different brands of cigarettes) you will spend about $360,000 a year on cigarettes, if you smoke 20 per day. If you buy them by the stick, then it will be more than the $360,000,” she outlined.Mrs. Chen said the issue was further compounded by tobacco companies’ practice of dispatching bike riders into inner-city communities to sell cigarettes.This, she said, was unfortunate, as it was the most vulnerable members of the society who would suffer the most.Mrs. Chen said consequent on the minimum wage being just over $300,000, this raised concerns about the ability of smokers in the lower income bracket to sustain themselves and their families, if they try to maintain this costly habit.In this regard, Mrs. Chen said the Coalition urges smokers in the lower income bracket to consider redirecting funds spent on cigarettes into taking care of their households. The Jamaica Coalition for Tobacco Control (JCTC) is concerned about the debilitating effects of tobacco on persons from low-income households using it. last_img read more

13 Oct

American household income finally topped 1999 peak last year

first_imgWASHINGTON – In a stark reminder of the damage done by the Great Recession and of the modest recovery that followed, the median American household only last year finally earned more than it did in 1999.Incomes for a typical U.S. household, adjusted for inflation, rose 3.2 per cent from 2015 to 2016 to $59,039, the Census Bureau said. The median is the point at which half the households fall below and half are above.Last year’s figure is slightly above the previous peak of $58,665, reached in 1999. It is also the first time since the recession ended in 2009 that the typical household earned more than it did in 2007, when the recession began.Trudi Renwick, the bureau’s assistant division chief, cautioned that the census in 2013 changed how it asks households about income, making historical comparisons less than precise.Still, the Census data is closely watched because of its comprehensive nature. It is based on interviews with 70,000 households and includes detailed data on incomes and poverty across a range of demographic groups.Elise Gould, a senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute, said that adjusting for the change in methodology, median income still remains below its 1999 peak. Yet she added that the census report shows that American households have made significant economic progress in 2015 and 2016.“We are definitely pulling ourselves out of the deep hole of the Great Recession,” Gould said on a conference call with reporters.Median household income rose $4,641, or 8.5 per cent, from 2014 through 2016. That’s the best two-year gain on records dating to 1967, according to analysts at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.Yet that improvement comes after a steep recession and a slow recovery that left most American households with barely any income increases. The lack of meaningful raises has left many people feeling left behind economically, a sentiment that factored into the 2016 elections.The report also showed that income inequality worsened last year, extending a trend in place for roughly four decades. Average incomes among the wealthiest 5 per cent climbed 5.5 per cent to $375,088. Average incomes for the poorest one-fifth of households, meanwhile rose 2.5 per cent to $12,943.Other measures of Americans’ economic health improved. The poverty rate fell last year to 12.7 per cent from 13.5 per cent, Census said. The number of people living below the poverty line declined 2.5 million to 40.6 million.That brings the proportion of households living below the poverty line back to pre-recession levels, though it remains about one and half percentage points higher than its lowest point, in 2000.A family of four with an income below $24,563 was defined as poor last year.And the proportion of Americans without health insurance fell to 8.8 per cent, the report showed, down from 9.1 per cent. It is the lowest proportion on record.The Census report covers 2016, the last year of the Obama administration.Robert Greenstein, president of the CBPP, argued that the agenda being pursued by President Donald Trump and congressional Republican leaders would reverse those gains.The income gains reflect mostly a rise in the number of Americans with jobs and in people working full time, the agency said. That means households were more likely to include a full-time worker. It also suggests that pay raises for those who already had jobs remained meagre.About 1.2 million more Americans earned income in 2016 than in 2015, and 2.2 million more had full-time year-round jobs.Incomes rose for most demographic groups. African-American median household income jumped 5.7 per cent to $39,490 in 2016 from the previous year, the most of any group. Among Latinos, it rose to 4.3 per cent to $47,675. For whites, the gain was 2 per cent to $65,041.Asian-Americans reported the highest household incomes, at $81,431, which was little changed from 2015.Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow at the CBPP, said the gains among African-Americans typically occur later in an economic recovery as employers widen their searches and step up hiring among traditionally disadvantaged groups.“The solid economy is helping to close racial gaps,” he said. “It won’t make them go away, but it is headed in the right direction.”The report found that the gender gap in wages narrowed last year for the first time since 2007. Women earned 80.5 per cent of men’s earnings, up from 79.6 per cent in 2015.Still, underneath the broad improvements nationwide, pockets of hardship remain. Poverty rates fell in the Northeast and South in 2016 but were mostly unchanged in the Midwest and West.Una Osili, a researcher at the Salvation Army and a professor of economics at Indiana University, said the non-profit group reported a spike in requests for health-related assistance in the Midwest last year, driven mostly by demand for opioid addiction treatment.That happened even in states like Indiana, where the unemployment rate and poverty fell, she said.In Nevada and some other Western states, the economic recovery has raised housing costs, offsetting some of the benefit of income growth.In those states, “the recovery is a good thing, but your rent is now higher,” Osili said.last_img read more

30 Sep

The BCS Wasnt Any Worse Than A College Football Playoff Will Be

Modern life has become the algorithmized life, a data-rich dreamscape in which the solution to nearly every problem lies somewhere inside a spreadsheet. Every problem, that is, except for college football’s.On Tuesday night, the new College Football Playoff (CFP) Committee will release its ranking of the best teams in college football. It’s a list generated by 13 human experts1Minus Archie Manning. — they’ll have the aid of simple statistics, sure, but ultimately the committee and its members’ human biases are the ones accountable. College football has moved the onus from the machines to the men.But only because the machines got them in trouble. In an unlikely marriage,2For a sport that still clings to the distinctly 19th-century notion of amateurism in the face of furious resistance. college football became an early adopter of numerically driven policymaking in 1998, when it ratified the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) to determine its consensus national champion.3To the extent that such a thing exists; Division I-A football is famously the only NCAA sport whose postseason is not governed by college athletics’ chief organizing body. Billed as an enlightened merger between the old-guard media polls — thus preserving the sport’s strong sense of tradition — and the computer rankings that so easily proliferated in the tech-boom ‘90s, the BCS was supposed to use data to help usher in a new era of college football.Instead, all it produced was controversy, revolt and a system so universally loathed that its demise was one of the few initiatives for which President Obama was able to marshall bipartisan support. A great deal of the criticism centered on “the computers,” a faceless army of machines that supposedly wouldn’t know a 3-4 defense from a 4-3. One of the biggest selling points of the College Football Playoff has been that it involves people who do know defensive formations.Yet there’s evidence that the switch from BCS to CFP won’t matter much, at least in terms of actually picking a champion with more efficiency. The big leap forward may simply be a lateral move.College football’s champion has always been more beauty-pageant winner than undisputed warrior. There are far too many teams — playing far too few games — to be able to rely on wins and losses alone as sole arbiters of worth. NFL teams make the playoffs through their records alone,4And, when necessary, an incredibly arcane tie-breaking process. but college football teams, marooned in various conferences, play schedules of vastly differing quality. Any endeavor to pick a truly national champion has to, by necessity, grapple with the balance between performance and strength of opposition.Originally, the media and coaches were the arbiters of who was great and who wasn’t, through the Associated Press Top 25 and the Coaches’ Poll. In theory, those who followed the sport most closely should produce a relatively equitable ranking of the country’s best teams. But the rankings became fraught with controversy and accusations of regional bias. The two major polls couldn’t always agree about which team was No. 1, producing a number of years in which multiple schools “won” the national championship. And college football’s longstanding system of bowl games, which act at once as postseason contests and meaningless exhibitions, occasionally complicated matters even further by contractually preventing the best teams from facing off even when there was clarity atop the polls.The BCS, which mixed polls with the supposed objectivity of computers, was supposed to fix all that. The existence of mathematical ranking systems in college football dated back at least 70 years prior, but since the AP began continuously issuing polls in 1936 these systems had never been the game’s preeminent selectors.It didn’t go smoothly. The computers became an easy punching bag for everything that fans and media hated about the BCS as a whole. “I think over the years, the computers were a scapegoat,” algorithm-maker Richard Billingsley told ESPN’s Mark Schlabach in August. “If there was an issue or if somebody didn’t like the results, it was the computers’ fault, and that wasn’t fair at all.”“Humans had more to do with the BCS than the computers did, but people were just wrong about it,” former BCS director Bill Hancock added. “I think the computers got a bum rap.”Even so, computer ratings played a large role in the BCS, and there were a number of reasons why the foray into data-crunching failed. First, the formula concocted by BCS creator Roy Kramer was inelegant, stirring the polls and computer ratings into an arbitrary statistical mishmash that included team loss totals and an arcane strength of schedule calculation. Also, it was badly overfit. As Stewart Mandel writes in “Bowls, Polls, and Tattered Souls,” Kramer “had his minions test the formula by applying it to past seasons’ results and making sure it spit out the correct two teams each year.” When future seasons5The ultimate out-of-sample test. failed to play out as tidily as the test sample did, the BCS endlessly tweaked its formula to retroactively “fix” whatever the previous year’s controversy was, rather than anticipating future fusses.And perhaps the BCS’s biggest sin of all was banishing computer rating systems that took into account a team’s margin of victory in its games. It was seeking to reduce the incentive for coaches to run up the score on overmatched opponents, but in doing so it also deprived the computer ratings of key data points. One of the most crucial findings in sabermetrics, across virtually all sports, is that the average margin by which a team wins or loses conveys more information than wins and losses alone. This is especially true in a sport like college football, where the sample of games is so small.Perhaps a computerized system could work if it were deployed with more skill. But college football’s decision-makers have decided instead that using no data — or at least a fuzzy interpretation of what’s available — is better than rigidly adhering to a defective model.And it may not make much of a difference.There will likely be a great deal of crossover between the playoff committee’s selection and the teams the BCS would have listed in its top four slots. In the estimation of SB Nation’s Bill Connelly, no fewer than 75 percent of the top four teams in the BCS rankings each year from 1998 to 2012 — and probably closer to 85 percent to 90 percent — aligned perfectly with the teams a hypothetical playoff committee would have selected had the current system been in place over those years.There also isn’t much distinction between the BCS’s and the CFP’s accuracy in determining the nation’s true best team. The CFP’s four-team bracket would be more likely to feature the deserving champion (a four-team playoff system has about a 45 percent greater chance of including the best team than a two-team setup like the BCS). But the CFP loses that advantage by forcing the top team to play an additional game, opening it up to becoming the victim of bad luck. According to past research of mine, a two-team playoff is won by the best team in the country about 29 percent of the time, while a four-team playoff crowns the best team at a 31 percent clip — hardly any improvement at all.The debut of the College Football Playoff is being celebrated as progress because it returns to the simplicity of human debate. But data and formulae ultimately weren’t to blame for the BCS’s woes, and it’s unlikely that its committee-based successor will reduce the number of college football controversies. Only an emotionless algorithm would have it any other way. read more

30 Sep

Gary Paytons Bad Advice Sparked Iversons Rant

Remember Allen Iverson’s infamous practice rant? You probably don’t, so refresh your recollection by watching the clip below. Former NBA player Gary Payton has just shed some light on Iverson’s odd rant. Now that Iverson is done playing NBA basketball for good, Gary Payton revealed that he was potentially the reason Iverson went on the infamous practice rant.In a segment on Fox Sports Live, Payton explained that a group of players were out having a good time and they had “a little bit too many.” Iverson asked Payton how he stayed in such good shape, avoided injuries and always remained on the court. Payton replied, “I told him for real that my coach, George Karl, didn’t let me practice. That was it. I said, ‘You have to stop practicing.’”Bleacher Reports‘ Dan Favale compared the two players’ stats, maybe Payton was on to something.In Payton’s 17-year career, he averaged 16.3 points, 6.7 assists and 3.9 rebounds per game. He played 80 or more games in a season 12 times.In Iverson’s 14-year career, he averaged 26.7 points, 6.2 assists and 3.7 rebounds per game. He played 80 or more games in a season three times. read more

28 Sep

Did The Referees Ruin The Mens NCAA Championship

FiveThirtyEight More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Embed Code Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (Apr. 4, 2017), we say goodbye to March Madness and break down the women’s and men’s NCAA championship games. Next, we investigate why NBA teams are resting their players early and often. Plus, a significant digit on Madison Bumgarner.FiveThirtyEight’s Benjamin Morris argues that Mississippi State earned every bit of their upset over UConn.Mississippi State ultimately lost the women’s championship game to South Carolina.Neil Paine notes that even though the men’s championship was tough to watch, UNC played ugly enough to win.That was not a good national title game, writes ESPN’s Myron Medcalf.The Ringer’s Rodger Sherman says it wasn’t UNC players who won the night — it was the referees.NBA teams are resting players earlier and earlier, Todd Whitehead writes for FiveThirtyEight.Significant Digit: 16.5, the average number of at-bats that San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner takes between hitting home runs, since 2014. Last Sunday, Bumgarner hit two home runs and became the first pitcher to hit more than one on Opening Day. read more

28 Sep

Can womens basketball buck UCONNs streak

Even after final exams this week, the No. 6 Ohio State women’s basketball team might not take its toughest test until Dec. 19. That’s the day the Buckeyes will get their shot at the No. 1 team in the nation: Connecticut. The Huskies are riding an 86-game winning streak. A win against the Buckeyes could extend the streak to 88, which would tie the 1971-74 UCLA men’s team for the longest winning streak in college basketball history. The game will be played at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan, N.Y. OSU coach Jim Foster said he’s looking forward to the location of the game more than he is the opponent. “A lot of people watch really interesting matchups, regardless of who it is. I think where it is is a little more significant than who. Connecticut is Connecticut, there’s no two ways about it,” Foster said. “But Connecticut at Madison Square Garden? That’s a historic building.” Connecticut will try to match OSU’s star power of center Jantel Lavender and guard Samantha Prahalis with its own duo in forward Maya Moore and guard Tiffany Hayes. All four players are members of the preseason watch list for the John R. Wooden award, which is given to the most outstanding player in college basketball each season. Moore won the award in 2009 and is Connecticut’s career leader in scoring. Prahalis said knocking off Connecticut would be a big moment for the OSU women’s basketball program. “Playing UConn and playing to our potential, and hopefully coming out with a victory, that would make our mark,” Prahalis said. The Buckeyes’ matchup with the Huskies will be the last marquee game of what has been a murderer’s row of a non-conference schedule for OSU. The Buckeyes will have already faced LSU, Virginia, Oklahoma and Syracuse before they take on Connecticut. Prahalis said the Buckeyes are always prepared for each opponent’s best effort. “Anytime we go somewhere to play, or that they come play us, they give us their best shot,” Prahalis said. “We wouldn’t expect anything less. We treat every opponent as they’re going to try their hardest, because they are.” The Buckeyes are 8-0 following an 95-84 win over Oklahoma. Foster said his team this year could perhaps be the best he’s coached in his nine seasons at OSU. “Maybe,” Foster said. “You can’t answer that question today, but I think we’ve got some depth that we haven’t had.” read more

28 Sep

Our honor defended by OSU defense

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Ohio State football freshman quarterback Braxton Miller completed just 1-of-4 passes against then-No. 16 Illinois, but it didn’t matter because the Buckeyes’ defense was up to the task. Defensive coordinate Jim Heacock’s unit limited Illinois to just seven points and 285 total yards of offense at Memorial Stadium Saturday as the Buckeyes (4-3, 1-2) captured a 17-7 upset win against the Fighting Illini (6-1, 2-1.) First-year OSU head coach Luke Fickell said two keys to Saturday’s game were turnovers and field position. In addition to denying the Illinois offense throughout the game, the OSU defense helped satisfy the two needs Fickell identified for the team. OSU held a 3-0 advantage at half time, but an interception by freshman corner back Bradley Roby, which he returned 36 yards, helped the Buckeyes extend their advantage. With the team just 12 yards from the end zone, Daniel “Boom” Herron scored on a touchdown on the next play to put the Buckeyes up, 10-0. “This is a game of momentum,” Fickell said after the game. “That’s probably the biggest thing about it (Roby’s interception). One thing we’ve lacked on defense is making some plays and to have a play start right there and then answer right away with the offense — that’s what this game is all about.” The touchdown came in Herron’s 2011 debut and with his return to the lineup, only senior receiver DeVier Posey remains suspended for the Buckeyes. Posey sold OSU football memorabilia in exchange for improper benefits in the form of tattoos and was also overpaid for work he did not do at a summer job. Sophomore corner back Dominic Clarke, who was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct for shooting what one witness described as a “compressed-air” gun from the top of Marketplace, a diner on OSU’s campus, did not travel with the team to Champaign. Another turnover that positioned OSU for a score came in the fourth quarter. Junior linebacker Storm Klein recovered a fumble on Illinois’ 37-yard line. Three plays after that, OSU again used the short field to its advantage as Miller completed his only pass of the game to junior tight end Jake Stoneburner for a 17-yard touchdown to put OSU up, 17-0. There was more to OSU’s defense than positioning the offense for scoring opportunities too. The Buckeye defense limited Illinois, which averaged 226 yards per game through six games, to 116 rushing yards on Saturday. “We tackled well,” Fickell said. “We didn’t give up big plays.” Sophomore safety C.J. Barnett agreed. “The coaches gave us a good game plan,” Barnett said. “We were able to execute. Everyone was able to do their job.” Sophomore defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins, junior defensive tackle John Simon and Klein also combined for seven tackles for loss, totalling -23 yards against Illinois. Simon, who claimed four of the seven tackles for loss and added two sacks, and Hankins both tallied career highs in tackles with eight and nine, respectively. Simon and Hankins helped OSU hold Illinois’ offense to 162 yards below its per game average through six games. Thanks to an efficient outing from both OSU’s offensive and defensive units, OSU junior tight end Reid Fragel said the team was ecstatic in the locker room after the game. “It’s a much-needed win,” Fragel said. “We kind of felt like our backs were against the wall. (With) both sides of the ball finally coming together, playing some good football, that’s big for us.” Fickell said more improvement is needed as the Buckeyes enter their bye week. “We’re not going to let this define us,” Fickel said. “This game is a lot more fun when you win. That momentum is so huge… and maybe those guys (the OSU players) haven’t had that in a while.” After the bye week, the Buckeyes continue Big Ten Leaders Division play against No. 4-ranked Wisconsin on Oct. 29 at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. read more

18 Sep

De Bruyne is the biggest monster Ive faced in the Premier

first_imgKevin De Bruyne is the best footballer I have ever faced in the Premier League, says new Everton forward RicharlisonThe Brazilian is quickly putting doubts over his £35m price tag to ease by scoring three goals in his first two league games at Everton following a disappointing first season in English football with Watford.And as for who is the “biggest monster” he has played against so far, Richarlison told Premier League Brasil: “The biggest monster is difficult to say, in a league that only has monsters (laughs).“But I think the guy who impressed me the most was De Bruyne. He put our team on the wheel last year.”The 21-year-old is convinced that manager Marco Silva will become regarded as one of Europe’s finest one day.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedSolskjaer praises Harry Maguire after Man United’s 1-0 win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Ole Gunnar Solskjaer singled out Harry Maguire for praise after helping Manchester United keep a clean sheet in their 1-0 win over Leicester City.“Marco Silva is a great coach,” Richarlison added.“And has been very important to me here. He is very attentive to the players, explains right whatever you do in the field, he does the same teaching style.“I have no doubt that he will be one of the great coaches of Europe in a short time. I’ve always played well with him and I hope he can reciprocate that confidence he has in my work on the field, delivering what he expects from me to the club and to my teammates.”Richarlison and Everton will be back in action on Saturday against Bournemouth.last_img read more

14 Sep

Homer Man Arrested For Threatening To Burn Down Home with Occupant Inside

first_imgBellamy was remanded into the Homer Jail. According to the online dispatch, an investigation led to the arrest of Raymond Bellamy, 73 of Homer, for assault and resisting arrest. On March 4, at 9:17 a.m., Troopers responded to an address on Skyline Drive in Homer for a report of a male threatening to burn the house down and to burn an occupant of the house.center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska State Troopers have arrested a man after he threatened to burn a house down while the occupant was still inside the home.last_img read more