31 Aug

University of Brighton design students makes biking safer with BLAZE projection system

first_img “Eighty per cent of cycle accidents occur when bicycles travel straight ahead and a vehicle maneuvers into them,” Ms. Brooke, told reporters. “The most common contributory factor is ‘failed to look properly’ on the part of a vehicle driver. The evidence shows the bike simply is not seen on city streets.”The system, which Ms. Brook developed in consultation with Brighton & Hove City Council, the Brighton & Hove Bus Company and driving psychologists projects the sharrow symbol in a green light bright enough to be seen in full daylight. For those of you not familiar with it the sharrow symbol is the sign for a shared lane. The system can be mounted to pedal bikes, scooters and motorcycles.This design has already won its inventor a paid course at Babson College in Massachusetts, where she can continue to develop BLAZE. No word yet on when BLAZE will be on sale. © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: www.brighton.ac.uk/cem/news/20 … 1may-emilyBrooke.php Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Emily Brooke, a design student at the University of Brighton, may just be the best friend that a biker has ever had. Anyone who has tried to ride a bike on crowded city streets knows how much of a challenge it can be to get in and out of traffic unscathed will be grateful for her new invention. Known only as BLAZE the handlebar mounted system. The system projects a laser image onto the road in front of the bike, alerting near by drivers that there is a cycle in the lane in situations where the driver may not have otherwise been aware of the presence of a bike rider. Hopefully, this early warning system will prevent drivers from changing into lanes with a bike in them.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: University of Brighton design students makes biking safer with BLAZE projection system (2011, June 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-university-brighton-students-biking-safer.html The science of bike-sharinglast_img read more

31 Aug

Stanfords batterylife research steps into economy class

first_img Journal information: Nature Communications © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Battery electrode’s 40,000 charge cycles look promising for grid storage Explore further “Several fundamental studies still need to be conducted to develop viable Si electrodes for batteries,” BATT has written in the past. “Yi Cui’s group at Stanford University is working on understanding the properties of various Si nanostructures and is designing new ones based on particles and wires that target improving Si cyclability.”BATT has recognized an important issue addressed by Cui, the conductivity of Si electrodes. “The electrical conductivity of Si is a major factor in determining the power and energy capabilities of an electrode that does not contain inactive materials such as conductive additives and binder. Future work in the Cui group will focus on designing new Si structures and pre-lithiation methods that are amenable to scale up so that large quantities of this anode material can be made at a low cost. Fundamental questions such as the best morphology for electrode packing, the type of surface coating for improving cyclability, and the optimal state of charge for these electrodes still need to be answered.”This month, Prof. Yi Cui and his Stanford team offer more answers in a newly published paper appearing in the journal Nature Communications. To compensate for fluctuating renewables in wind and solar systems, new approaches to storage are needed and Cui’s team present a battery technology that works when the sun or wind falls short, in the form of sharp drop-offs of wind and solar systems. The battery electrodes can run for a thousand charge cycles without degrading, an advancement when typically the electrodes degrade with time. As New Scientist translates, the secret sauce in their battery prototype involves the negatively charged cathode coating in copper hexacyanoferrate and an anode made of activated carbon and a conductive polymer. The compounds allow electricity-carrying ions to move in and out easily.”We demonstrate a new type of safe, fast, inexpensive, long-life aqueous electrolyte battery, which relies on the insertion of potassium ions into a copper hexacyanoferrate cathode and a novel activated carbon/polypyrrole hybrid anode. The cathode reacts rapidly with very little hysteresis. The hybrid anode uses an electrochemically active additive to tune its potential. This high-rate, high-efficiency cell has a 95% round-trip energy efficiency when cycled at a 5C rate, and a 79% energy efficiency at 50C. It also has zero-capacity loss after 1,000 deep-discharge cycles.”As important to the design is the cost factor. A key stumbling block in the search for answers in energy storage rests in viability. Many solutions are promising in the lab but present daunting costs that are eventually branded as impractical. No existing energy storage technology, the Cui team said, can economically provide the power, cycle life and energy efficiency needed to respond to the costly short-term transients that arise from renewables and other aspects of grid operation.”Virtually all of the energy-storage capacity currently on the grid is provided by pumped hydroelectric power, which requires an immense capital investment, is location-dependent and suffers from low energy efficiency,” according to the authors. They said that their battery’s components are cheap and commercially available.via www.newscientist.com/blogs/one … d-scale-battery.html (Phys.org)—Looking for better battery designs and solutions is a priority pursuit for many scientists, and the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program is always on the lookout for worthy contributions. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, BATT is a leader in U.S. research in battery solutions for electric vehicles. They have not missed the fact that Prof. Yi Cui, Associate Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University, has been leading a team that is coming up with new answers for energy storage. More information: Nature Communications 3, Article number: 1149 doi:10.1038/ncomms2139 Citation: Stanford’s battery-life research steps into economy class (2012, October 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-stanford-battery-life-economy-class.htmllast_img read more

31 Aug

Rock appears mysteriously in front of Mars Opportunity rover

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further (Phys.org) —The lead scientist for NASA’s Mars rover exploration team (Steve Squyres) has announced that recent images beamed back by the Opportunity rover show a rock sitting in a place nearby where there wasn’t one just twelve days prior. The image, he says, has caused quite a commotion with the rover team as possible explanations for the sudden appearance of the rock are bandied about. The announcement was part of a meeting at California Institute of Technology to celebrate a decade of service by the tiny rover. © 2014 Phys.org Mars rover photographs featured at US museum (Update)center_img Opportunity has of course, far outlived expectations. What was originally supposed to be a three month tour has now passed ten years. In all that time, nothing on the planet’s surface has changed of its own accord. Until now. Opportunity sent back an image of the landscape just ahead of it, then twelve days later, sent back another image of virtually the same landscape (Opportunity is waiting in place for bad weather to subside). The images showed everything to be the same except for a small rock—a jelly doughnut sized rock. How it got there has NASA’s best scratching their heads. Thus far, they have two main likely explanations: either the rock was tossed to that spot after a meteorite impact nearby, or far more likely, it came to rest there as a result of clumsy maneuvering by Opportunity itself. The rover is having trouble getting around these days as one of its actuators has failed. This means one wheel winds up scrapping the ground during turns, producing what Squyres described as “chatter” which he said could have caused some debris to be flung to where the rock is now sitting.An initial inspection of the rock indicates that it’s very high in sulphur and potassium—it has bright white edges with a deep ruby red center, and looks very much like a jelly doughnut. The rover team has named it “Pinnacle Island.” Squyres reported that the rock appears to be in an upside-down position, which means it’s showing a face that has not been impacted by the Martian atmosphere, for perhaps millions of years.The rover team plans to conduct further tests on the rock, and will almost certainly have the rover spin around as soon as it’s able to see if other rocks have appeared as well. Citation: Rock appears mysteriously in front of Mars Opportunity rover (2014, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-mysteriously-front-mars-opportunity-rover.html Credit: NASAlast_img read more

31 Aug

Post iceage extinctions of large mammals linked to humans not climate change

first_img The giant sloth succumbed to the advance of humans. Credit: Wikimedia Commons The researchers even went so far as to calculate the percentages of species extinctions they believe can be blamed on humans—64 percent globally—while only 30 percent could be blamed on fast changing weather patterns (mostly in parts of Europe and Asia). Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B © 2014 Phys.org Explore further More information: Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published 4 June 2014 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.3254AbstractThe late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132 000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial–interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary.Press release India’s ancient mammals survived multiple pressurescenter_img (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with Aarhus University in Denmark has concluded that the die-out of large mammals after the last ice-age was due more too human activity than a changing environment. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the team describes how they conducted a country by country survey of all known species extinctions from one thousand years ago to 132,000 years ago. In comparing what they found with known environmental changes during the same period they found a pattern emerging that fingered humans as the main cause of the majority of the extinctions. Citation: Post ice-age extinctions of large mammals linked to humans, not climate change (2014, June 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-ice-age-extinctions-large-mammals-linked.html As the ice melted at the end of the Pleistocene epoch about 12,000 years ago, large mammals (greater than 10 kilograms) such as the woolly mammoth, the giant sloth, cave dwelling lions, etc. began dying off, eventually disappearing altogether. The cause of the extinctions has, in many cases, been blamed on changing environmental conditions, despite a lack of evidence. In this new effort, the research team has found some evidence to suggest the die-offs were more likely caused by humans—either directly by hunting, or indirectly by burning vegetation needed for survival.Suspecting that humans were the cause, the researchers conducted a survey of all known species of large mammals that went extinct during and after the Pleistocene epoch. To gain a new perspective they conducted the survey on a country by country basis, rather than by continent as past studies have done. The team then used the data they’d collected to perform a comparative analysis with known weather conditions in the areas where the animals went extinct. In so doing, the team found a pattern emerging—the shorter amount of time that the large mammals lived together with humans, the greater the number of species that went extinct. Put another way, the team found that extinctions were few in Africa where large mammals and humans had existed since the time humans learned to hunt them. More extinctions occurred in Eurasia, but the greatest number by far occurred in the Americas and Australia, where humans arrived later, armed with much better hunting skills. Restoration of a steppe mammoth. Credit: Kurzon/Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

31 Aug

A way to measure and control phonons

first_img More information: Sungkun Hong et al. Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry of single phonons from an optomechanical resonator, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan7939AbstractNano- and micromechanical devices have become a focus of attention as new solid-state quantum devices. Reliably generating non-classical states of their motion is of interest both for addressing fundamental questions about macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as for developing quantum technologies in the domains of sensing and transduction. We use quantum optical control techniques to conditionally generate single-phonon Fock states of a nanomechanical resonator. We perform a Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment that verifies the non-classical nature of the phonon state without requiring full state reconstruction. Our result establishes purely optical quantum control of a mechanical oscillator at the single phonon level. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Vienna in Austria and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a technique using photons for controlling and measuring phonons. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their technique and suggest that their work might have laid the groundwork toward a method to store information in a quantum computer. © 2017 Phys.org Journal information: Science Phonons are waves of particles moving together through a material—like ocean waves, they propagate, leaving the particles through which they move in their original state. Prior research has shown that phonons have some behavioral characteristics that resemble particles, which is why they have been labeled quasiparticles, and also why they have been of interest in so much recent research. Scientists are interested in phonons because they may provide a bridge between the classical world and the quantum world. In this new effort, the researchers have developed a way not only to measure phonons as they propagate, but show that it is possible to control them, as well.The technique involved firing a blue pulse of light at what they describe as a microfabricated silicon nanobeam—a form of optomechanical crystal. It was designed to vibrate in particular ways when hit by a photon. As the blue light struck the device, it created phonons. They next fired a red pulse of light at the phonons to induce a state-swap interaction. Those photons were then reflected back to a photon detector and were subsequently analyzed using Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry. The researchers used the state of the photons to determine the non-classical state of the phonons in the device. The team showed that individual phonons moving in a crystal follow the laws of quantum mechanics as opposed to classical physics.The researchers point out that because of its quantum properties and the use of light, the technique offers a possible path toward using phonons as a means for storing quantum information of the type that could be needed in a quantum computer. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: A way to measure and control phonons (2017, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-phonons.html In the center is an image showing the mechanical oscillator which was cooled to its ground state and then successfully excited by a single quanta of energy. Depicted above is the simulation of the shape of the mechanical mode that is used in the experiment. The bottom picture shows an artist’s impression of a quasi-probabilistic distribution of the quantum state. Credit: Moritz Forsch / TU Delft Team succeeds in observing a two-phonon quantum interference, a world first This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

31 Aug

Want to Be Less Racist Move to Hawaii

first_imgKristin Pauker still remembers her uncle’s warning about Dartmouth. “It’s a white institution,” he said. “You’re going to feel out of place.” Dr. Pauker, who is now a psychology professor, is of mixed ancestry, her mother of Japanese descent and her father white from an Italian-Irish background. Applying to colleges, she was keen to leave Hawaii for the East Coast, eager to see something new and different. But almost immediately after she arrived on campus in 1998, she understood what her uncle had meant. She encountered a barrage of questions from fellow students. What was her ethnicity? Where was she from? Was she Native Hawaiian?The questions seemed innocent on the surface, but she sensed that the students were really asking what box to put her in. And that categorization would determine how they treated her. “It opened my eyes to the fact that not everyone sees race the same way,” she told me. Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more

31 Aug

Whatever Happened To The 101YearOld Cham

first_imgWhatever Happened To … The 101-Year-Old Champion Runner… by NPR News Chhavi Sachdev 8.28.19 12:10pm Man Kaur started running in 2009, when she was in her 90s — it was her son’s idea — and began racking up medals. We first wrote about her when she was 101. Is she still a track and field star?At 103, Man Kaur is not only going strong, she’s getting others to follow in her footsteps.India’s oldest female athlete is spending her summer coaching 30 young athletes.Kaur and her 81-year-old son and trainer, Gurdev Singh, were invited for two weeks to several universities in Baru Sahib in the mountains of India, but their methods made such an improvement in the students’ performance, they were asked to stay through September.Kaur famously follows a strict diet regimen designed by Singh including homemade soy milk and kefir, wheatgrass juice, nuts, lentils and chapatis made from sprouted wheat. That’s the kind of nutritional advice they’re sharing with the students.This invitation came on the heels of Kaur’s participation in the World Masters Athletics Championships in Poland earlier this year, where she won gold in all four events she competed in: shot put, javelin, 60-meter dash and 200-meter run.Though she was the only competitor in her age category for all four events, for the 60-meter dash, she had company from other categories: two sprightly 85-year-olds and three 90-year-olds. Though they weren’t competing for the prize in her age bracket, they ran alongside her (and eventually ahead of her).At last year’s World Masters event, the diminutive great-grandmother, who is just under 5 feet tall, clinched the gold in the javelin throw as well as the 200-meter race.In 2017, while participating in World Masters Games held at Auckland, she finished the 100-meter run in 74 seconds. “But in Poland she improved her speed and finished the 60-meter dash in 36 seconds and felt great. She thanked the Almighty who gave her enough courage to do this,” says Singh, who acts as an interpreter for his mother, who mostly speaks Punjabi.Ten years after she first started running, Kaur still loves it, according to her son. She isn’t thinking of retiring and Singh says she still thinks she can improve her performance.”She enjoys the company of her admirers,” her son adds. “Every time she participates, she feels proud that people around the world feel inspired.”The year has not been all fun and games, though. Kaur was in the hospital with gallstones this August and her osteoporosis has been causing her back pain, says her son. Still, she loves winning and is happiest on the track, where she says she forgets all her ailments.Next stop: Malaysia, where both mother and son will compete in their age brackets at the Asian Masters Athletics Championships in December.Editor’s note: Now you may be thinking … is Man Kaur really 103? She doesn’t have proof of her age but her oldest child does. When her firstborn’s birth certificate was issued 83 years ago, Kaur was 20, so you do the math. Chhavi Sachdev is a journalist based in Mumbai. Contact her @chhavi.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more

31 Aug

Provisional arrest of 3 Swiss officials sought

first_imgCBI on Wednesday told a Delhi court that the Indian Embassy at Berne has requested authorities there for provisional arrest of three officials of Switzerland-based Swiss Timing Limited, against whom summons were issued for their alleged roles in a 2010 CWG-related corruption case.The agency told the court that it had recently written a letter to MHA to apprise it about the progress of its request seeking provisional arrest of the three foreign nationals and the ministry’s reply was still awaited. The court had earlier issued summons to Swiss Timing’s GM Christophe Berthaud, Sales and Marketing Manager S Chianese and Multi Sports Events and Sales Manager J Spiri for their alleged involvement in the graft case.last_img read more

31 Aug

Colours from Israel

first_imgFor its third participation at India Art Fair, the Bruno Art Group from Israel presents a selection of its most outstanding artists in the exhibition titled Colors of the World featuring artists like Raphael Abecassis, Yaacov Agam, Dganit Blechner, Simona Bocchi, Charles Fazzino, David Gerstein, SlavaIlyayev, Yuval Mahler, Anu Malhotra, Arnaud Nazare-Aga and Calman Shemi.Color is the main theme of the booth. The language of colors binds the exhibiting artists and at the same time each of them uses color in a distinctly individual way. The artists used colors to depict narrations from life, atmosphere through figures and shapes of art. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The exhibition presents a gamut of contemporary masters from across the globe. From Israel there is Raphael  Abecassis the Israeli contemporary master in narration of Biblical stories: his work depicts with vivid colors traditions, mythical figures and iconographies; Yaacov Agam is the pioneer of the kinetic movement in art and its most outstanding contemporary representative as well as the highest-selling Israeli artist; Dganit Blechner is known for using bright and cheerful colors, together with extraordinary compositions of cities and icons from movies. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDavid Gerstein uses effective cut out steel layers of colors, Slava Ilyayev makes oil painting vibrant using the thickness of colors;  Yuval Mahler draws upon a rich supply of wry humor, satire, caricature and comedy to produce his insightful studies of human behavior and Israeli master Calman Shemi who developed the ‘soft painting’ technique. His motifs from nature become universal signs for land, water, sky, vegetation, and sunlight. Arnaud Nazare-Aga, together with his wife Adeline from France create sculptures inspired by sensual lines, gentle roundness and glossy colors. Indian documentary film-maker Anu Malhotra’s impressive paintings showcase free and exuberant use of colors and inspiration from natural elements. Italian sculpture Simona Bocchi, based in Italy and India, expresses concepts of power and harmony of nature through the manipulation of marble, bronze and plaster. American artist Charles Fazzino is the most popular 3-D and highly-collected pop artist in the world today.  ?Bruno Art Group, with galleries in Israel, Singapore, Turks and Caicos Islands and USA, is one of the few art houses that provides quality Israeli and international artwork by renowned masters of art. With over 100 years of expertise in the industry, Bruno Art Group was born from the passion of its founder Motti Abramovitz and evolved into one of the fastest growing art houses in the region. Works include spectacular art by great Israeli masters like Marcel Janco, Yaacov Agam, David Gerstein, Reuven Rubin – and many more.When: January 29 – February 2 Where: NSIC Exhibition Grounds, New Delhilast_img read more

31 Aug

Indulge in exquisite delicacies at GT Route

first_imgThe GT Route, a multi cuisine restaurant located at Park Street, highlighted the culinary delights from Kabul to Kolkata. ‘The great Harvest Festival’ is the first of its kind rice food festival. It showcased an array of enticing and exotic rice preparations.“We always wanted to have a festival which will also explore the other exotic cuisines prepared from rice. We have also tried to keep the food as innovative as possible, so with every bite we ensure that the taste is perfect,” said Ishtiaque Ahmed, director, Shiraz Hotels. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The wide array of delicacies includes Karara Chawal Kebab (Shallow fried rice cakes), Masaledar Kathal Pulao (jack fruit and rice cooked with traditional Oudhi herb and dry chili), Bag-e-Bahar Kichdi (Rice lentil and vegetable cooked together and served with pickle), Shahi Soya Biriyani (saffron scented soya nuggets biryani served with yoghurt), Prawn Wild Rice Conjee (Wild and prawn thick soup served with pickled veg), Gosht ki Tehari (Rampur style spiced mutton pulao), Nargishi Kofta Biryani (Mutton minces wrapped egg served with Burani Ghol), Lalbagh Murg Biryani (Murshidabad style chicken pressure biryani served with fritter chilly and peanut yoghurt gravy), Machher Bhapa Pulao(boneless fish and rice cooked together with lemon and mustard and served with Raita), Muri ghonto(Fish head and govind bhog rice cooked together completely with Bengali condiments), and Zarda Pulao (Traditionally mixed dry fruits sweet pulao.) Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixRupam Banik, executive Chef said: “All of the foods are cooked keeping in mind the health quotient of the people. Especially the Prawn Wild Rice Conjee is the healthiest food and whole some diet and those have problem with prawn can also remake it with meat of their choices. It is also good supplement for heart patients.”This pocket friendly festival will serve both lunch and dinner and will start from March 5 and will continue till March 20.last_img read more

31 Aug

Woman dragged by hair molested in Ballygunge on New years day 6

first_imgKolkata: A young woman and her family members were harassed late on Monday night while they were waiting for the woman’s fiance in front of a sweet shop in Ballygunge.The woman was dragged by hair out the car and molested. She ran all the way to the police station to seek help. Later, police initiated a case and arrested two persons. According to the complaint, around 2 am on Monday night, she, along with her uncle and sister, was waiting for the woman’s fiance. Meanwhile, two young man saw them standing while they were passing by on a bike. It is alleged that the duo hurled lewd and abusive comments toward the women and left. On seeing them leaving, the woman ignored. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeBut within a few minutes, around 8-9 men arrived at the spot and started hurling expletives at the woman and her family members. The woman and her family members tried to leave the place but could not as their car was surrounded by the miscreants and their bikes. Almost at the same time, her fiance arrived and protested. As a result, the accused persons got furious and started beating him up using bricks and bamboo sticks. When the woman protested and screamed for help, some men pulled her by hair and dragged her out of the car. She also alleged that the miscreants tried to remove her cloths and molested her. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedOn seeing the woman getting harassed, her sister and uncle tried to resist but were also beaten up badly. All them sustained multiple bleeding injuries. The woman alleged that several security guards working at different housing complexes located there just watched the incident. None came to their rescue. Meanwhile, the woman started running towards the police station along with others. They were allegedly being chased by the miscreants. According to the woman, the miscreants also mentioned of killing her and others there. The car’s glass was broken. Later, the victims managed to reach Ballygunge police station and narrated the whole incident. Immediately, police rushed them to a hospital and another team went to the spot but found none. Later, the sleuths monitored CCTV footages and identified the miscreants. Following which two arrests were made. The two persons are identified as Sumit Poddar and Rohit Paswan. They were remanded to police custody till Thursday, when they will be produced before the court. Later, police arrested four more persons identified as Indrajit Haldar, alias Habla, Santu Mondal, alias Bhagna, Somenath Patra, alias Putli and Biswanath Patra, alias Lalu.last_img read more

31 Aug

Elderly man found dead at home

first_imgKolkata: An elderly person was found lying in a pool of blood at a house in Karaya on Thursday morning. Police recovered his body and sent for autopsy examination.According to local residents, on Thursday around 5:30 am, some persons of a multi-storied building located on May Fair Road in Karaya found Abhijit Chatterjee, 73, in a pool of blood. Immediately, police were informed. Later, sleuths rushed him to Chittaranjan National Medical College (CNMC) and Hospital where doctors declared brought dead. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseDuring autopsy examination doctors said Chatterjee died as he fell from height. According to local residents, Chatterjee used to live alone in flat located on the seventh floor of that multistoried residential building. It is suspected that he might have fallen from the balcony of his flat. Though no foul play could be detected till Thursday night, sleuths are trying to make sure that whether he committed suicide or he fell down accidentally. Police are questioning his neighbours about Chatterjee’s daily routine, mainly when he used to get up from sleep. If it is found that Chatterjee used to wake up late, then it could a case of suicide as question will arise why he woke up early on Thursday. But police are quite sure that it is a case of accident. Primarily an unnatural death case has been lodged at the Karaya police station.last_img read more

31 Aug

Prayaas A mystical evening

first_imgDelhiites enjoyed a mystical Kathak performance at the 10th edition of annual Kathak production ‘Prayaas 2018’, organised by Rasik Performing Arts at Kamani Auditorium on December 15.The evening started with Ganesh stuti – an invocation to Lord Ganesh, praying for success and peace. This was followed by the first performance lined up for the event – ‘Khil Rahi’, a presentation by the youngest batch of students at Rasik Performing Arts. Next in queue was ‘Umang’ which is based on a Tarana in ‘Raag Bhopali’. This Tarana is set in the sixteen beat cycle of Teentaal. ‘Pieces of Ten’ – a rhythmic cycle of 10 beats presenting infinite possibilities of grouping and regrouping phrases, numbers and movement patterns within the cycle orbit of ten – took the evening forward. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSpeaking on the 10th edition of Prayaas, Guru Jayashree Archarya and co-founder of Rasik Performing Arts, said “I am glad that ‘Prayaas’ completed its 10 successful years, and I am looking forward to many more editions to come. All this was not possible without the hard work of all my students and even the parents who are sending their kids to learn classical dance. Even today, where western music and dance are dominating, there are some parents who want their kids to acquire the art of traditional classical dance form.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive Creating a phenomenal aura of dance and music, many performances were staged, keeping the audience glued to their seats throughout the event. ‘Echoes of nine’ – a mesmerising piece of work that used ‘Raag Jaijayanti’ as its melodic backdrop, was also staged during Prayaas 2018. Coming from Rasik Performing Arts, one of the batch performed ‘Gati’, which was based on a Sargam in ‘Raag Charukeshi’. The act highlighted the joy of ‘Taiyaari’, which can be explained as the control and command over speed and the free flow of dance movements. Following ‘Gati’ was the next act – the poetry speaks of the ‘Nayika’ who sets out to meet her beloved amidst the stormy night. The Tarana was composed by the legendary maestro of Indian Classical Music – Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh. With a blend of the syllables typical of Tarana with excerpts from Persian poetry, ‘Darbari Tarana’ came next in the performance sequences at the event. The act is a combination of mnemonic syllables compared against the melodic exploration of a Raag and rhythmic journey of a taal, speaking about the eternal longing of the earthly soul that craves for a meeting with its divine beloved. ‘Raag Bhairavi’ was the last performance by the batch of Rasik Performing Arts, in which the choreography tried to capture various aspects of this musical scale and artists depicted a sense of peace and spiritual awakening. The show-stopper of the evening was the guest artist – Sandeep Mullick who performed ‘Navras’ in Paaramparik Kathak, accompanied by Shiv Shankar Ray (Tabla), Anirban Bhattacharya (Vocal Music) and Salim (Sitar).last_img read more

31 Aug

Artwork that depicts splendors of nature

first_imgTaking inspiration from the ethos of the romantic era whence nature became centre for the origin of all creative genius, a group show featuring artworks by artists like Arjun Das, Binay Sinha, Dayananda N, and others is on view at Triveni Kala Sangam.Inaugurated on March 23, in the presence of Adwaita Charan Gadanayak, Director General, National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi, the art show will go on until March 31, 6.00 pm to 8:30 pm. The late eighteenth century witnessed the emergence of an Also Read – Add new books to your shelfintellectual and artistic movement that transpired a response against the expanding capitalism and a scientific rationale gripping the western world. Spiritual alienation lurked upon humanity. The romantics voiced against such depraved idiosyncrasies through their works In this exhibition, artists have depicted and mimicked the splendors of nature and its overwhelming aspect. The participating artists in this exhibition aspire to forge a discourse upon the shifting relationship between humans and their natural habitation. Their points of engagement are distinct but the premise remains constant around which they weave their narratives.last_img read more

31 Aug

Avoid comfort food during stress

first_imgIndulging in high-calorie ‘comfort’ foods when you are stressed can lead to more weight gain than usual, scientists say. Researchers from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia discovered a molecular pathway in the brain, controlled by insulin, which drives the additional weight gain. Using an animal model, the team showed that a high-calorie diet when combined with stress resulted in more weight gain than the same diet caused in a stress-free environment. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”This study indicates that we have to be much more conscious about what we’re eating when we’re stressed, to avoid a faster development of obesity,” said Herbert Herzog, who led the study. Some individuals eat less when they’re stressed, but most will increase their food intake – and crucially, the intake of calorie-dense food high in sugar and fat. To understand what controls this ‘stress eating’, the team investigated different areas of the brain in mice. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveWhile food intake is mainly controlled by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, another part of the brain – the amygdala – processes emotional responses, including anxiety. “Our study showed that when stressed over an extended period and high calorie food was available, mice became obese more quickly than those that consumed the same high fat food in a stress-free environment,” said Kenny Chi Kin Ip, lead author of the study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. At the centre of this weight gain, the scientists discovered, was a molecule called NPY, which the brain produces naturally in response to stress to stimulate eating in humans as well as mice. “We discovered that when we switched off the production of NPY in the amygdala weight gain was reduced. Without NPY, the weight gain on a high-fat diet with stress was the same as weight gain in the stress-free environment,” said Ip. “This shows a clear link between stress, obesity and NPY,” he said. To understand what might control the NPY boost under stress, the scientists analysed the nerve cells that produced NPY in the amygdala and found they had receptors, or ‘docking stations’, for insulin – one of the hormones which control our food intake. Under normal conditions, the body produces insulin just after a meal, which helps cells absorb glucose from the blood and sends a ‘stop eating’ signal to the hypothalamus feeding centre of the brain. In the study, the scientists discovered that chronic stress alone raised the blood insulin levels only slightly, but in combination with a high-calorie diet, the insulin levels were 10 times higher than mice that were stress-free and received a normal diet. The study showed that these prolonged, high levels of insulin in the amygdala caused the nerve cells to become desensitised to insulin, which stopped them from detecting insulin altogether. In turn, these desensitised nerve cells boosted their NPY levels, which both promoted eating and reduced the bodies’ normal response to burn energy through heat, the study showed. “Our findings revealed a vicious cycle, where chronic, high insulin levels driven by stress and a high-calorie diet promoted more and more eating.”last_img read more

30 Aug

Mysterious Dogs in Texas have Ghost Genes DNA of Extinct Red Wolves

first_imgThe Red Wolf is a canine species native to the Southwestern United States. It was declared extinct in the wild in 1980. Extinction came from many causes, ranging from loss of habitat from human expansion, to over hunting by humans to protect livestock. In an attempt to revive some of the genetic characteristics that were disappearing due to the breeding programs used by conservationists, several groups of captive wolves were reintroduced into the wild.Red WolfGenetic traits can be lost when animals are bred in captivity due to the lack of pressure from the environment, which leads to an increase in genetic drift.Many within the scientific and conservationist communities believed that the reintroduced populations were the only groups that survived in the wild. In 2007, it was thought that there were roughly 300 red wolves in the world, with 207 of those in captivity.USFWS worker with red wolf pups, August 2002.In January of 2019, this number was estimated to be around 40 in the wild, and limits were placed upon hunting of coyotes at night because red wolves can be mistaken for coyotes.It turns out that the genetic traits which appear in red wolves haven’t totally died out in the wild, however. Completely by chance, it was found that the red wolf wasn’t the only species that had certain genetic traits.Melanistic individual at Audubon Park, New Orleans (1931). Photo by Stanley Clisby Arthur CC BY SA 3.0Ron Wooten, a field biologist in Galveston, Texas contacted researchers at Princeton University to bring their attention to wild dogs he had observed to exhibit some of the traits of red wolves.Wooten had been studying the wild dogs from afar and had noted that the population had subtle differences from the standard coyotes in the area.Comparative image of the red wolf (C. rufus) & the coyote (C. latrans). Photo by Red Wolf Recovery Program/ Jitze Couperus/B. Bartel/USFWS CC BY 2.0These differences piqued Wooten’s interest, and he decided to take samples from two members of the wild dog population which had been hit by vehicles. Wooten then emailed the team at Princeton, letting them know that he had DNA samples for them to examine.The team agreed, and two samples were sent to the lab. Elizabeth Heppenheimer, a graduate student working at Princeton, said that somehow what arrived was one sample and the scalpel used to get the sample, still uncleaned. This was a first for them, as among their massive collection of samples from coyotes and wolves, the team had never received a scalpel before.Skulls of North American Canis, with red wolf in the center.After taking the samples of DNA, the team compared the DNA to many different types of canines throughout the Southeastern United States. After careful comparisons, they found that the genetics of this species of wild dogs was very closely related to red wolves that were being kept in captivity.The comparison wasn’t identical, however, and the team stated that the wild dogs did have sections of their genetic code which matched parts of coyote DNA.Ussuri dhole (Cuon alpinus alpinus), also known as the Indian wild dog.The truly fascinating thing about this discovery is that many traits which had practically disappeared in the captive population of wolves were thriving out in the wild among this population of wild dogs.For conservationists who were worried that these traits would die out, there would be another moment of good news. This discovery was mirrored by one in Louisiana where another group of canines was found with similar traits.Reported by AP, Ron Sutherland, a conservation scientist with Wildlands Network, said “the Galveston canines have effectively quashed a decades-old impression that red wolves were a feckless predator overwhelmed by the numerical superiority of coyotes.”Sutherland also talked about how this was a unique form of canine that needed to be protected by conservationists and wildlife agencies.Read another story from us: Extinct Predator Cave Lions Could be Brought Back to LifeBecause of several instances where traits of endangered species have turned up in hybrid animals, many scientists and conservationists have come around to the idea that pure genetic lines are no longer a priority, as hybrid genetics are allowing traits to be continued in the wild.last_img read more

30 Aug

Nobody hunts rattlesnakes like Mike Gundy and his Mississippi Mudflap

first_imgPeople thought Oklahoma State football coach Mike Gundy’s mullet was a gimmick when he started growing it, shows what they know. Gundy lives and breathes everything that has to do with the Kentucky Waterfall life.Gundy posted a tweet when he was out huntin’ rattlesnakes with his buddies Todd and Wild Bill in Oklahoma, because of course he was.From the picture, it’s hard to tell which guy is the big-time college football coach, and which one is “Wild Bill.”Business in the Front, rattlesnake hunting in the back.Rattlesnake hunt in Okeene, OK with Todd and Wild Bill. pic.twitter.com/0SqWb9LxFk— Mike Gundy (@CoachGundy) March 17, 2017last_img read more

30 Aug

Chugathon Runner shotguns a beer after each mile of halfmarathon Video

first_imgIt goes without saying that most activities are better with a few cold beers. Distance running isn’t usually the first one that comes to mind.One drunken distance runner decided to shotgun a beer after each mile of a recent half marathon in one of the most impressive displays of drinking endurance ever witnessed.For those that aren’t strong with the math, a half marathon is 13.1 miles, so that means he pounded a 12 pack, plus one.After the race, when asked for his thoughts on the accomplishment, the buzzed marathoner slurred, “Are you looking at me, jerk?! You don’t love me.”last_img read more

30 Aug

Monitoring Your Employees EMail

first_img It might seem Big Brother-like for you to monitor employee e-mail, but there may be good reasons for doing so. You might suspect an employee is disclosing trade secrets, violating company policy, downloading pornography or harassing another employee via e-mail. Or you may want to make sure that communication with clients is always professional.The Electronic Communication Privacy Act, also known as the Stored Communications Act, prohibits interception of electronic communications under most circumstances. However, it allows companies to monitor employees’ e-mail stored on company-owned servers and in cases when employees consent to employer access to e-mail.On top of federal law, some state courts have held that employees have a basic expectation of privacy that employers can’t violate. “The most obvious legal concern is making sure you’re not setting yourself up for an invasion-of-privacy claim,” says attorney Maureen O’Neill, partner at Paul, Hastings, Jenofsky & Walker in Atlanta. To avoid that, make it clear that company e-mail is not private communication. “Set it up so the employees have no expectation of privacy.”O’Neill notes that a simple, practical way to do that is to put a notice on the login screen that the system is the property of the employer, and that by logging on to the employer’s system, employees agree that any e-mail communications and web use may be monitored by the employer. Likewise, include a similar notice in the employee handbook.Use common sense, though, in monitoring employee e-mail and web use. Before monitoring em-ployees, make sure there is a good business reason to do so. Good employees can feel mistrusted by learning that the company may be checking up on them.Jane Easter Bahls is a writer in Rock Island, Illinois, specializing in business and legal topics. 2 min read This story appears in the January 2006 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals January 1, 2006 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more

30 Aug

This Is What the Internet Will Look Like in 2025

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 4 min read Tomorrow, the World Wide Web turns 25. To mark the occasion, the Pew Research Center asked a range of entrepreneurs, researchers, writers and developers, among others, for their predictions about what the it will look like in 10 years.Their responses, unsurprisingly, run the gamut from hopeful and excited to darkly pessimistic. Depending on the person, the web will make the world a fairer, more connected and knowledgeable place or transform it into a fragmented cesspool of greed where terrorism is a daily reality.However, most experts do agree that as it ages, the World Wide Web will become more pervasive as well as seamlessly accessible. Emerging technologies, including wearable and embedded computing, will enable us to easily connect (or perhaps never disconnect) from a cloud of sophisticated, intelligent and cheap (maybe even free) processing power.Here are a range of predictions for what the web will look like at 35.Related: ‘Future of Now’: The Convergence of Social Media, Crowdfunding and TechMore integrated. “The Internet will shift from the place we find cat videos to a background capability that will be a seamless part of how we live our everyday lives. We won’t think about ‘going online’ or ‘looking on the Internet’ for something — we’ll just be online, and just look.” — Joe Touch, director at the University of Southern California’s Information Sciences InstituteCheaper and more insightful. “When the cost of collecting information on virtually every interaction falls to zero, the insights that we gain from our activity, in the context of the activity of others, will fundamentally change the way we relate to one another, to institutions, and with the future itself. We will become far more knowledgeable about the consequences of our actions; we will edit our behavior more quickly and intelligently.” — Patrick Tucker, author of The Naked Future: What Happens In a World That Anticipates Your Every Move?“We will grow accustomed to seeing the world through multiple data layers. This will change a lot of social practices, such as dating, job interviewing and professional networking, and gaming, as well as policing and espionage.” — Daren C. Brabham, a professor at the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, University of Southern CaliforniaA more detailed recorder of daily life.“We’ll have a picture of how someone has spent their time, the depth of their commitment to their hobbies, causes, friends, and family. This will change how we think about people, how we establish trust, how we negotiate change, failure, and success.” — Judith Donath, a fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and SocietyRelated: The Internet of Things: New Threats Emerge in a Connected WorldFragmented. “The Internet will generate several new related networks. Some will require verified identification to access, while others will promise increased privacy.” — Sean Mead, senior director of strategy and analytics for Interbrand“The Internet will fragment. Global connectivity will continue to exist, but through a series of separate channels controlled by a series of separate protocols. Our use of separate channels for separate applications will be necessitated by security problems, cyber policy of nations and corporations, and our continued attempts to find better ways to do things.” — Ian Peter, pioneer Internet activist and Internet rights advocateDark and hierarchical. “Everything — every thing — will be available online with price tags attached. Cyber-terrorism will become commonplace. Privacy and confidentiality of any and all personal will become a thing of the past. Online ‘diseases’ — mental, physical, social, addictions (psycho-cyber drugs) — will affect families and communities and spread willy-nilly across borders. The digital divide will grow and worsen beyond the control of nations or global organizations such as the UN. This will increasingly polarize the planet between haves and have-nots. Global companies will exploit this polarization. Digital criminal networks will become realities of the new frontiers. Terrorism, both by organizations and individuals, will be daily realities. The world will become less and less safe, and only personal skills and insights will protect individuals.” — Llewellyn Kriel, CEO and editor in chief of TopEditor International Media Services“Yes, the information we want will increasingly find its way to us, as networks learn to accurately predict our interests and weaknesses. But that will also tempt us to stop seeking out knowledge, narrowing our horizons, even as we delve evermore deep. The privacy premium may also be a factor: only the relatively well-off (and well-educated) will know how to preserve their privacy in 2025.” — An anonymous respondentRelated: Passwords You Swallow, Sharks That Tweet and 90-MPH Cheeseburgers Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global March 11, 2014 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more