31 Aug

University of Brighton design students makes biking safer with BLAZE projection system

first_img “Eighty per cent of cycle accidents occur when bicycles travel straight ahead and a vehicle maneuvers into them,” Ms. Brooke, told reporters. “The most common contributory factor is ‘failed to look properly’ on the part of a vehicle driver. The evidence shows the bike simply is not seen on city streets.”The system, which Ms. Brook developed in consultation with Brighton & Hove City Council, the Brighton & Hove Bus Company and driving psychologists projects the sharrow symbol in a green light bright enough to be seen in full daylight. For those of you not familiar with it the sharrow symbol is the sign for a shared lane. The system can be mounted to pedal bikes, scooters and motorcycles.This design has already won its inventor a paid course at Babson College in Massachusetts, where she can continue to develop BLAZE. No word yet on when BLAZE will be on sale. © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: www.brighton.ac.uk/cem/news/20 … 1may-emilyBrooke.php Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Emily Brooke, a design student at the University of Brighton, may just be the best friend that a biker has ever had. Anyone who has tried to ride a bike on crowded city streets knows how much of a challenge it can be to get in and out of traffic unscathed will be grateful for her new invention. Known only as BLAZE the handlebar mounted system. The system projects a laser image onto the road in front of the bike, alerting near by drivers that there is a cycle in the lane in situations where the driver may not have otherwise been aware of the presence of a bike rider. Hopefully, this early warning system will prevent drivers from changing into lanes with a bike in them.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: University of Brighton design students makes biking safer with BLAZE projection system (2011, June 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-university-brighton-students-biking-safer.html The science of bike-sharinglast_img read more

31 Aug

Stanfords batterylife research steps into economy class

first_img Journal information: Nature Communications © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Battery electrode’s 40,000 charge cycles look promising for grid storage Explore further “Several fundamental studies still need to be conducted to develop viable Si electrodes for batteries,” BATT has written in the past. “Yi Cui’s group at Stanford University is working on understanding the properties of various Si nanostructures and is designing new ones based on particles and wires that target improving Si cyclability.”BATT has recognized an important issue addressed by Cui, the conductivity of Si electrodes. “The electrical conductivity of Si is a major factor in determining the power and energy capabilities of an electrode that does not contain inactive materials such as conductive additives and binder. Future work in the Cui group will focus on designing new Si structures and pre-lithiation methods that are amenable to scale up so that large quantities of this anode material can be made at a low cost. Fundamental questions such as the best morphology for electrode packing, the type of surface coating for improving cyclability, and the optimal state of charge for these electrodes still need to be answered.”This month, Prof. Yi Cui and his Stanford team offer more answers in a newly published paper appearing in the journal Nature Communications. To compensate for fluctuating renewables in wind and solar systems, new approaches to storage are needed and Cui’s team present a battery technology that works when the sun or wind falls short, in the form of sharp drop-offs of wind and solar systems. The battery electrodes can run for a thousand charge cycles without degrading, an advancement when typically the electrodes degrade with time. As New Scientist translates, the secret sauce in their battery prototype involves the negatively charged cathode coating in copper hexacyanoferrate and an anode made of activated carbon and a conductive polymer. The compounds allow electricity-carrying ions to move in and out easily.”We demonstrate a new type of safe, fast, inexpensive, long-life aqueous electrolyte battery, which relies on the insertion of potassium ions into a copper hexacyanoferrate cathode and a novel activated carbon/polypyrrole hybrid anode. The cathode reacts rapidly with very little hysteresis. The hybrid anode uses an electrochemically active additive to tune its potential. This high-rate, high-efficiency cell has a 95% round-trip energy efficiency when cycled at a 5C rate, and a 79% energy efficiency at 50C. It also has zero-capacity loss after 1,000 deep-discharge cycles.”As important to the design is the cost factor. A key stumbling block in the search for answers in energy storage rests in viability. Many solutions are promising in the lab but present daunting costs that are eventually branded as impractical. No existing energy storage technology, the Cui team said, can economically provide the power, cycle life and energy efficiency needed to respond to the costly short-term transients that arise from renewables and other aspects of grid operation.”Virtually all of the energy-storage capacity currently on the grid is provided by pumped hydroelectric power, which requires an immense capital investment, is location-dependent and suffers from low energy efficiency,” according to the authors. They said that their battery’s components are cheap and commercially available.via www.newscientist.com/blogs/one … d-scale-battery.html (Phys.org)—Looking for better battery designs and solutions is a priority pursuit for many scientists, and the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program is always on the lookout for worthy contributions. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, BATT is a leader in U.S. research in battery solutions for electric vehicles. They have not missed the fact that Prof. Yi Cui, Associate Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University, has been leading a team that is coming up with new answers for energy storage. More information: Nature Communications 3, Article number: 1149 doi:10.1038/ncomms2139 Citation: Stanford’s battery-life research steps into economy class (2012, October 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-stanford-battery-life-economy-class.htmllast_img read more

31 Aug

Rock appears mysteriously in front of Mars Opportunity rover

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further (Phys.org) —The lead scientist for NASA’s Mars rover exploration team (Steve Squyres) has announced that recent images beamed back by the Opportunity rover show a rock sitting in a place nearby where there wasn’t one just twelve days prior. The image, he says, has caused quite a commotion with the rover team as possible explanations for the sudden appearance of the rock are bandied about. The announcement was part of a meeting at California Institute of Technology to celebrate a decade of service by the tiny rover. © 2014 Phys.org Mars rover photographs featured at US museum (Update)center_img Opportunity has of course, far outlived expectations. What was originally supposed to be a three month tour has now passed ten years. In all that time, nothing on the planet’s surface has changed of its own accord. Until now. Opportunity sent back an image of the landscape just ahead of it, then twelve days later, sent back another image of virtually the same landscape (Opportunity is waiting in place for bad weather to subside). The images showed everything to be the same except for a small rock—a jelly doughnut sized rock. How it got there has NASA’s best scratching their heads. Thus far, they have two main likely explanations: either the rock was tossed to that spot after a meteorite impact nearby, or far more likely, it came to rest there as a result of clumsy maneuvering by Opportunity itself. The rover is having trouble getting around these days as one of its actuators has failed. This means one wheel winds up scrapping the ground during turns, producing what Squyres described as “chatter” which he said could have caused some debris to be flung to where the rock is now sitting.An initial inspection of the rock indicates that it’s very high in sulphur and potassium—it has bright white edges with a deep ruby red center, and looks very much like a jelly doughnut. The rover team has named it “Pinnacle Island.” Squyres reported that the rock appears to be in an upside-down position, which means it’s showing a face that has not been impacted by the Martian atmosphere, for perhaps millions of years.The rover team plans to conduct further tests on the rock, and will almost certainly have the rover spin around as soon as it’s able to see if other rocks have appeared as well. Citation: Rock appears mysteriously in front of Mars Opportunity rover (2014, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-mysteriously-front-mars-opportunity-rover.html Credit: NASAlast_img read more

31 Aug

Post iceage extinctions of large mammals linked to humans not climate change

first_img The giant sloth succumbed to the advance of humans. Credit: Wikimedia Commons The researchers even went so far as to calculate the percentages of species extinctions they believe can be blamed on humans—64 percent globally—while only 30 percent could be blamed on fast changing weather patterns (mostly in parts of Europe and Asia). Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B © 2014 Phys.org Explore further More information: Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published 4 June 2014 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.3254AbstractThe late Quaternary megafauna extinction was a severe global-scale event. Two factors, climate change and modern humans, have received broad support as the primary drivers, but their absolute and relative importance remains controversial. To date, focus has been on the extinction chronology of individual or small groups of species, specific geographical regions or macroscale studies at very coarse geographical and taxonomic resolution, limiting the possibility of adequately testing the proposed hypotheses. We present, to our knowledge, the first global analysis of this extinction based on comprehensive country-level data on the geographical distribution of all large mammal species (more than or equal to 10 kg) that have gone globally or continentally extinct between the beginning of the Last Interglacial at 132 000 years BP and the late Holocene 1000 years BP, testing the relative roles played by glacial–interglacial climate change and humans. We show that the severity of extinction is strongly tied to hominin palaeobiogeography, with at most a weak, Eurasia-specific link to climate change. This first species-level macroscale analysis at relatively high geographical resolution provides strong support for modern humans as the primary driver of the worldwide megafauna losses during the late Quaternary.Press release India’s ancient mammals survived multiple pressurescenter_img (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with Aarhus University in Denmark has concluded that the die-out of large mammals after the last ice-age was due more too human activity than a changing environment. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the team describes how they conducted a country by country survey of all known species extinctions from one thousand years ago to 132,000 years ago. In comparing what they found with known environmental changes during the same period they found a pattern emerging that fingered humans as the main cause of the majority of the extinctions. Citation: Post ice-age extinctions of large mammals linked to humans, not climate change (2014, June 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-ice-age-extinctions-large-mammals-linked.html As the ice melted at the end of the Pleistocene epoch about 12,000 years ago, large mammals (greater than 10 kilograms) such as the woolly mammoth, the giant sloth, cave dwelling lions, etc. began dying off, eventually disappearing altogether. The cause of the extinctions has, in many cases, been blamed on changing environmental conditions, despite a lack of evidence. In this new effort, the research team has found some evidence to suggest the die-offs were more likely caused by humans—either directly by hunting, or indirectly by burning vegetation needed for survival.Suspecting that humans were the cause, the researchers conducted a survey of all known species of large mammals that went extinct during and after the Pleistocene epoch. To gain a new perspective they conducted the survey on a country by country basis, rather than by continent as past studies have done. The team then used the data they’d collected to perform a comparative analysis with known weather conditions in the areas where the animals went extinct. In so doing, the team found a pattern emerging—the shorter amount of time that the large mammals lived together with humans, the greater the number of species that went extinct. Put another way, the team found that extinctions were few in Africa where large mammals and humans had existed since the time humans learned to hunt them. More extinctions occurred in Eurasia, but the greatest number by far occurred in the Americas and Australia, where humans arrived later, armed with much better hunting skills. Restoration of a steppe mammoth. Credit: Kurzon/Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

31 Aug

A way to measure and control phonons

first_img More information: Sungkun Hong et al. Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry of single phonons from an optomechanical resonator, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aan7939AbstractNano- and micromechanical devices have become a focus of attention as new solid-state quantum devices. Reliably generating non-classical states of their motion is of interest both for addressing fundamental questions about macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as for developing quantum technologies in the domains of sensing and transduction. We use quantum optical control techniques to conditionally generate single-phonon Fock states of a nanomechanical resonator. We perform a Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment that verifies the non-classical nature of the phonon state without requiring full state reconstruction. Our result establishes purely optical quantum control of a mechanical oscillator at the single phonon level. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Vienna in Austria and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a technique using photons for controlling and measuring phonons. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their technique and suggest that their work might have laid the groundwork toward a method to store information in a quantum computer. © 2017 Phys.org Journal information: Science Phonons are waves of particles moving together through a material—like ocean waves, they propagate, leaving the particles through which they move in their original state. Prior research has shown that phonons have some behavioral characteristics that resemble particles, which is why they have been labeled quasiparticles, and also why they have been of interest in so much recent research. Scientists are interested in phonons because they may provide a bridge between the classical world and the quantum world. In this new effort, the researchers have developed a way not only to measure phonons as they propagate, but show that it is possible to control them, as well.The technique involved firing a blue pulse of light at what they describe as a microfabricated silicon nanobeam—a form of optomechanical crystal. It was designed to vibrate in particular ways when hit by a photon. As the blue light struck the device, it created phonons. They next fired a red pulse of light at the phonons to induce a state-swap interaction. Those photons were then reflected back to a photon detector and were subsequently analyzed using Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry. The researchers used the state of the photons to determine the non-classical state of the phonons in the device. The team showed that individual phonons moving in a crystal follow the laws of quantum mechanics as opposed to classical physics.The researchers point out that because of its quantum properties and the use of light, the technique offers a possible path toward using phonons as a means for storing quantum information of the type that could be needed in a quantum computer. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: A way to measure and control phonons (2017, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-phonons.html In the center is an image showing the mechanical oscillator which was cooled to its ground state and then successfully excited by a single quanta of energy. Depicted above is the simulation of the shape of the mechanical mode that is used in the experiment. The bottom picture shows an artist’s impression of a quasi-probabilistic distribution of the quantum state. Credit: Moritz Forsch / TU Delft Team succeeds in observing a two-phonon quantum interference, a world first This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

31 Aug

Want to Be Less Racist Move to Hawaii

first_imgKristin Pauker still remembers her uncle’s warning about Dartmouth. “It’s a white institution,” he said. “You’re going to feel out of place.” Dr. Pauker, who is now a psychology professor, is of mixed ancestry, her mother of Japanese descent and her father white from an Italian-Irish background. Applying to colleges, she was keen to leave Hawaii for the East Coast, eager to see something new and different. But almost immediately after she arrived on campus in 1998, she understood what her uncle had meant. She encountered a barrage of questions from fellow students. What was her ethnicity? Where was she from? Was she Native Hawaiian?The questions seemed innocent on the surface, but she sensed that the students were really asking what box to put her in. And that categorization would determine how they treated her. “It opened my eyes to the fact that not everyone sees race the same way,” she told me. Read the whole story: The New York Timeslast_img read more

31 Aug

Whatever Happened To The 101YearOld Cham

first_imgWhatever Happened To … The 101-Year-Old Champion Runner… by NPR News Chhavi Sachdev 8.28.19 12:10pm Man Kaur started running in 2009, when she was in her 90s — it was her son’s idea — and began racking up medals. We first wrote about her when she was 101. Is she still a track and field star?At 103, Man Kaur is not only going strong, she’s getting others to follow in her footsteps.India’s oldest female athlete is spending her summer coaching 30 young athletes.Kaur and her 81-year-old son and trainer, Gurdev Singh, were invited for two weeks to several universities in Baru Sahib in the mountains of India, but their methods made such an improvement in the students’ performance, they were asked to stay through September.Kaur famously follows a strict diet regimen designed by Singh including homemade soy milk and kefir, wheatgrass juice, nuts, lentils and chapatis made from sprouted wheat. That’s the kind of nutritional advice they’re sharing with the students.This invitation came on the heels of Kaur’s participation in the World Masters Athletics Championships in Poland earlier this year, where she won gold in all four events she competed in: shot put, javelin, 60-meter dash and 200-meter run.Though she was the only competitor in her age category for all four events, for the 60-meter dash, she had company from other categories: two sprightly 85-year-olds and three 90-year-olds. Though they weren’t competing for the prize in her age bracket, they ran alongside her (and eventually ahead of her).At last year’s World Masters event, the diminutive great-grandmother, who is just under 5 feet tall, clinched the gold in the javelin throw as well as the 200-meter race.In 2017, while participating in World Masters Games held at Auckland, she finished the 100-meter run in 74 seconds. “But in Poland she improved her speed and finished the 60-meter dash in 36 seconds and felt great. She thanked the Almighty who gave her enough courage to do this,” says Singh, who acts as an interpreter for his mother, who mostly speaks Punjabi.Ten years after she first started running, Kaur still loves it, according to her son. She isn’t thinking of retiring and Singh says she still thinks she can improve her performance.”She enjoys the company of her admirers,” her son adds. “Every time she participates, she feels proud that people around the world feel inspired.”The year has not been all fun and games, though. Kaur was in the hospital with gallstones this August and her osteoporosis has been causing her back pain, says her son. Still, she loves winning and is happiest on the track, where she says she forgets all her ailments.Next stop: Malaysia, where both mother and son will compete in their age brackets at the Asian Masters Athletics Championships in December.Editor’s note: Now you may be thinking … is Man Kaur really 103? She doesn’t have proof of her age but her oldest child does. When her firstborn’s birth certificate was issued 83 years ago, Kaur was 20, so you do the math. Chhavi Sachdev is a journalist based in Mumbai. Contact her @chhavi.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more

31 Aug

Provisional arrest of 3 Swiss officials sought

first_imgCBI on Wednesday told a Delhi court that the Indian Embassy at Berne has requested authorities there for provisional arrest of three officials of Switzerland-based Swiss Timing Limited, against whom summons were issued for their alleged roles in a 2010 CWG-related corruption case.The agency told the court that it had recently written a letter to MHA to apprise it about the progress of its request seeking provisional arrest of the three foreign nationals and the ministry’s reply was still awaited. The court had earlier issued summons to Swiss Timing’s GM Christophe Berthaud, Sales and Marketing Manager S Chianese and Multi Sports Events and Sales Manager J Spiri for their alleged involvement in the graft case.last_img read more

31 Aug

Colours from Israel

first_imgFor its third participation at India Art Fair, the Bruno Art Group from Israel presents a selection of its most outstanding artists in the exhibition titled Colors of the World featuring artists like Raphael Abecassis, Yaacov Agam, Dganit Blechner, Simona Bocchi, Charles Fazzino, David Gerstein, SlavaIlyayev, Yuval Mahler, Anu Malhotra, Arnaud Nazare-Aga and Calman Shemi.Color is the main theme of the booth. The language of colors binds the exhibiting artists and at the same time each of them uses color in a distinctly individual way. The artists used colors to depict narrations from life, atmosphere through figures and shapes of art. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The exhibition presents a gamut of contemporary masters from across the globe. From Israel there is Raphael  Abecassis the Israeli contemporary master in narration of Biblical stories: his work depicts with vivid colors traditions, mythical figures and iconographies; Yaacov Agam is the pioneer of the kinetic movement in art and its most outstanding contemporary representative as well as the highest-selling Israeli artist; Dganit Blechner is known for using bright and cheerful colors, together with extraordinary compositions of cities and icons from movies. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDavid Gerstein uses effective cut out steel layers of colors, Slava Ilyayev makes oil painting vibrant using the thickness of colors;  Yuval Mahler draws upon a rich supply of wry humor, satire, caricature and comedy to produce his insightful studies of human behavior and Israeli master Calman Shemi who developed the ‘soft painting’ technique. His motifs from nature become universal signs for land, water, sky, vegetation, and sunlight. Arnaud Nazare-Aga, together with his wife Adeline from France create sculptures inspired by sensual lines, gentle roundness and glossy colors. Indian documentary film-maker Anu Malhotra’s impressive paintings showcase free and exuberant use of colors and inspiration from natural elements. Italian sculpture Simona Bocchi, based in Italy and India, expresses concepts of power and harmony of nature through the manipulation of marble, bronze and plaster. American artist Charles Fazzino is the most popular 3-D and highly-collected pop artist in the world today.  ?Bruno Art Group, with galleries in Israel, Singapore, Turks and Caicos Islands and USA, is one of the few art houses that provides quality Israeli and international artwork by renowned masters of art. With over 100 years of expertise in the industry, Bruno Art Group was born from the passion of its founder Motti Abramovitz and evolved into one of the fastest growing art houses in the region. Works include spectacular art by great Israeli masters like Marcel Janco, Yaacov Agam, David Gerstein, Reuven Rubin – and many more.When: January 29 – February 2 Where: NSIC Exhibition Grounds, New Delhilast_img read more

31 Aug

Indulge in exquisite delicacies at GT Route

first_imgThe GT Route, a multi cuisine restaurant located at Park Street, highlighted the culinary delights from Kabul to Kolkata. ‘The great Harvest Festival’ is the first of its kind rice food festival. It showcased an array of enticing and exotic rice preparations.“We always wanted to have a festival which will also explore the other exotic cuisines prepared from rice. We have also tried to keep the food as innovative as possible, so with every bite we ensure that the taste is perfect,” said Ishtiaque Ahmed, director, Shiraz Hotels. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The wide array of delicacies includes Karara Chawal Kebab (Shallow fried rice cakes), Masaledar Kathal Pulao (jack fruit and rice cooked with traditional Oudhi herb and dry chili), Bag-e-Bahar Kichdi (Rice lentil and vegetable cooked together and served with pickle), Shahi Soya Biriyani (saffron scented soya nuggets biryani served with yoghurt), Prawn Wild Rice Conjee (Wild and prawn thick soup served with pickled veg), Gosht ki Tehari (Rampur style spiced mutton pulao), Nargishi Kofta Biryani (Mutton minces wrapped egg served with Burani Ghol), Lalbagh Murg Biryani (Murshidabad style chicken pressure biryani served with fritter chilly and peanut yoghurt gravy), Machher Bhapa Pulao(boneless fish and rice cooked together with lemon and mustard and served with Raita), Muri ghonto(Fish head and govind bhog rice cooked together completely with Bengali condiments), and Zarda Pulao (Traditionally mixed dry fruits sweet pulao.) Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixRupam Banik, executive Chef said: “All of the foods are cooked keeping in mind the health quotient of the people. Especially the Prawn Wild Rice Conjee is the healthiest food and whole some diet and those have problem with prawn can also remake it with meat of their choices. It is also good supplement for heart patients.”This pocket friendly festival will serve both lunch and dinner and will start from March 5 and will continue till March 20.last_img read more