23 Jun

Charity begins at home – Frank Keating

first_imgA popular Test and club player, ‘Parksy’ was also a notable Barbarian –and it’s the Baa-Baas I think of as pioneers of rugby’s great charitable tradition from the time in 1948 when the Wallaby tourists, who had so flamboyantly and generously re-established peacetime rugby here, found themselves unable to return home. All passages on ships were full via Suez or South Africa – so the Baa-Baas organised their first farewell Cardiff match for a touring team and 50,000 turned up to ensure the Wallabies could afford the far dearer Atlantic-Pacific tickets via Canada and British Columbia. Happy days.When it comes to rugby, charity begins at home.This article appeared in the July 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Richard Parks during his epic 737 challenge for charityRugby is a good game, sure… and a good game brimful of goodness. Of all the major team sports, can there be a more consistently generous one than rugby?Think of any rugby club you know – from the superior and snooty to the parish-pump piffling – and it would be a major shock-horror surprise, wouldn’t it, if it was a club which wasn’t sponsoring, bolstering or encouraging some good and worthwhile charitable concern, cause or crusade?The rugby ethos fosters and warmly cherishes an inbuilt philanthropy and good neighbourliness. Rugby and charity – you can’t have one without the other. The good Samaritan is a permanent player on every rugby team sheet. Down almost a century and a half we’ve known how rugby has made great men achieve great things on the field. As well rugby makes great men achieve great things off the field – just think of true greats like Cliff Morgan, Tony O’Reilly, Andy Ripley and Lawrence Dallaglio, and think of their charitable works and the zillions they’ve raised.And now think, too, of Richard Parks, the former Wales flanker forced to retire from rugby, who has been spending 2011 attempting a dramatic world first, the 737 Challenge in which he aims to conquer the seven mountain summits of all seven continents as well as reach the three poles – North, South and the roof of the world, Everest. Some journey, some ambition – and all for Marie Curie Cancer Care.As bold Richard was confronting his self-imposed epic challenges, it goes without saying that the rest of rugby was deeply committed to its own non-stop myriad of charity works big and small… from tens of thousands of club events for local worthwhile causes the world over to the established global goodness of the Wooden Spoon charity, founded cheerfully in 1983 on the back of another dismal England loss in Dublin.Then there’s John Beeby’s 2011 walk across America, another of good Matt Hampson’s annual treks to Twickenham for the Premiership final, the outstanding military fund Help for Heroes, fellow journo Sam Peters and his Row2Recovery, and magical Dan Carter and his Kiwi compatriots coming to London to stage that magnificent match so soon after the earthquake devastation of the beautiful city of Christchurch…It was when Parks knew his shoulder injury was so chronic that he had to give up playing that, adrift and sorry for himself, he came across a book by veteran explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes. Before he had finished it, Richard was depressed and downcast no longer – but was already formulating his gripping expedition – and all against a seven-month clock! To climb his final peak, Mount Elbrus in Russia, he has booked as his partner inspirational author Sir Ranulph. Double Olympic medallist rower Steve Williams had accompanied him on the North Pole and Everest legs, and he’d been joined up Kilimanjaro by Marie Curie nurse Jan Stuart. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

23 Jun

England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_imgAfter a disastrous home World Cup in 2015, England would go on to lose against South Africa in the final. Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideLooking to get over the terrible 2015 Rugby World Cup, England tried to put those demons to bed in the final against South Africa. However they got totally outplayed.How They QualifiedEngland qualified automatically for the 2019 tournament.Key PlayersThere’s plenty of Saracens muscle up front, where Maro Itoje and the Vunipola brothers, Billy and Mako, are automatic choices when fit. Another Saracen, goalkicking Owen Farrell, calls the shots behind.Saracens trio: from left, Owen Farrell, Maro Itoje and Jamie George are three of England’s finest (Getty)The Coach – Eddie JonesThe jocular Australian has a proud track record, winning the trophy as an assistant coach with South Africa in 2007.In the spotlight: Eddie Jones hopes to achieve success in the country he coached at RWC 2015 (Getty)Major Work-onsThey have been criticised for their failure to adapt during matches and have been known to concede heavy penalty counts.England Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSunday 11 August 2019: England 33-19 WalesSaturday 17 August 2019: Wales 13-6 England Saturday 24 August 2019: England 57-15 IrelandFriday 6 September 2019: England 37-0 ItalyRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-upsEngland Rugby World Cup GroupEngland are in Group C alongside France, Argentina, USA, and Tonga.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup Group Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide The Americans have been building in the right… England Rugby World Cup FixturesSun 22 Sep England 35-3 Tonga (Sapporo) Match reportThu 26 Sep England 45-7 USA (Kobe) Match reportSat 5 Oct England 39-10 Argentina (Tokyo) Match reportSat 12 Oct England 0-0 France (Yokohama) Match cancelled – click here for storySat 19 Oct QF1 England 40-16 Australia (Oita) Match reportSat 26 Oct SF1 England 19-7 New Zealand (Yokohama) Match ReportSat 2 Nov RWC 2019 Final England 12-32 South Africa (Yokohama) Match Report USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Los Pumas failed to make it to the… Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide England Rugby World Cup Kit Expand Expand Collapse All you need to know about Les Bleus… Important match: England v France could decide who tops the group in Japan (Getty Images)England Rugby World Cup SquadEddie Jones has named his 31-man training squad below;Forwards (17):Dan ColeLuke Cowan-DickieTom CurryEllis GengeJamie GeorgeMaro ItojeGeorge KruisJoe LaunchburyCourtney LawesLewis LudlamJoe MarlerKyle SincklerJack SingletonSam UnderhillBilly VunipolaMako VunipolaMark WilsonBacks (14):Joe CokanasigaElliot DalyOwen FarrellGeorge FordPiers FrancisWilli Heinz (ruled out by a hamstring injury picked up in the semi-final and replaced by Ben Spencer)Jonathan JosephJonny MayRuaridh McConnochieJack NowellHenry SladeManu TuilagiAnthony WatsonBen YoungsRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordEngland’s Rugby World Cup Record: P44 W31 D0 L131987 Quarter-finals1991 Runners-up1995 Fourth1999 Quarter-finals2003 Champions2007 Runners-up2011 Quarter-finals2015 Pool stages2019 Runners-upFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unlikely to proceed to the knockout stages, Tonga… Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Expandlast_img read more

23 Jun

Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch matches online from anywhere

first_imgIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch matches through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches.The Foxtel Sports HD bundle is $74 a month – and you get 50+ other channels as well as Foxtel GO so you can watch when on the move.If you don’t want a long-term contract, you can also stream games live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer The prize! The Gallagher Premiership trophy (Getty Images) Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch matches online from anywhereThe Gallagher Premiership returns on Friday 20 November, with champions Exeter Chiefs taking on Harlequins less than a month after lifting the trophy.With the 2020-21 season starting late due to the delayed completion of the last campaign because of the Covid-19 pandemic, Premiership matches will be played throughout the Six Nations so that all 22 rounds can be completed before the semi-finals (18-19 June) and final (26 June).Related: Gallagher Premiership fixturesNewcastle Falcons have replaced Saracens in the top flight – the former winning promotion from the Championship and the latter being relegated due to salary cap breaches – while Exeter will be looking to add more silverware to their trophy cabinet having won the European and domestic double in 2019-20.No doubt you’ll want to watch the action unfold. Below we explain how to find a reliable Gallagher Premiership live stream wherever you are.How to watch the Gallagher Premiership from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, like World Cup winner Faf de Klerk, then SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from JapanDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Premiership matches in Japan. The service is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Find out more about DAZN here We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. center_img All the details you need to watch the English top flight wherever you are in the world Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that SKY Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from the UKGallagher Premiership matches are shown live on BT Sport in the UK, with at least two games broadcast from each round. If you don’t have a BT contract, don’t worry because you can still easily watch Premiership matches online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Gallagher Premiership live stream: How to watch from EuropeThere are two main options to watch Premiership matches in Europe.SFR Sport shows matches in Belgium, France, Luxembourg and Portugal as well as Israel. You can sign up to SFR Sport from just €9 a month! Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

23 Jun

Jonny May’s Top Five Tries

first_img3. 2014, v WorcesterWith Gloucester playing out from their own line, May showed his coast-to-coast speed, performing the Gumball Rally across the Sixways turf. It was a busy game for May – he’d score two and be yellow-carded.Faced with the rather pacey Josh Drauniniu, May’s diagonal seemed to be covered almost all the way, until it suddenly wasn’t and a yawning chasm opened up in front of him.There was still work to do, but May made his in-and-out look as simple as picking up a burger at a drive-thru, pointing to the heavens before even crossing the line like prime Chris Ashton.It’s quite entertaining to watch the cameraman struggle to keep up with the long-limbed flyer.2. 2014, v New ZealandHow many of us have imagined scoring our debut Test try against New Zealand at Twickenham? Was it a screamer? Was it just me? May lived out this fantasy – and we picked this score at one of the greatest tries of the 2010s for our 60th anniversary.Remember that thing about making great players look stupid? May goes straight in between the two Smiths, Ben and Conrad, the latter looking back with such alarm that you’d have thought May had burgled his two Rugby World Cup medals.Israel Dagg’s positioning looked perfect, but somehow, improbably yet easily, May rounds him on the outside, making the jet-heeled full-back look more like a dolt than Usain Bolt.1. 2020, v IrelandWe’ve just heard about May’s first England try… but his best has to be his most recent, Saturday’s tour de force against the Irish. It looks like a career highlight montage condensed into a single score – the in-and-out, the skip, the chip, the sheer grass-singeing pace.It begins 90 metres out, with May’s sidestep on Chris Farrell. Bundee Aki makes a forlorn diving attempt to reach him, but the wing had already purred through the space like a sports car changing lanes.A roadblock stood in front of him, but May went airborne, chipping the ball over Hugo Keenan to take the Ireland full-back out of the game. Jamison Gibson Park had the inside line to gather, but you just knew he wouldn’t get there first. The England man skipped out of the scrum-half’s clutches as if he was playing hopscotch and his fly-hack bounced up perfectly into his waiting arms.The only moment that lacked grace was his final flop onto the ground – but with more defenders beaten than there were fans in the ground I think he can be forgiven.All that remains is to see if May can beat Rory Underwood’s England try-scoring record of 49 – and to wonder if he will add another scorcher to this list. Who would bet against him? Jonny May’s Top Five TriesJonny May’s pace ignited a slow weekend of rugby, the wing scoring one of the great Twickenham tries in England’s 18-7 win over Ireland in the Autumn Nations Cup. The Gloucester flyer is no stranger to spectacular scores, as this countdown of his top five touchdowns will show.But first, a quick round-up of the tries that narrowly missed out. Narrowing May’s best tries down to only a top five is almost like asking Picasso to paint a canvas using only primary colours, so here are a few honourable mentions.I could have picked this try against France in 2019, in which May outruns Morgan Parra and Damian Penaud so easily that he looks like a greyhound let loose at a kindergarten sports day or an F1 car at a Renault Clio convention.There’s also a double on England’s 2018 tour of South Africa, the series in which he really cemented his place in England’s first-choice XV – a John Bentley-esque swerving score on the Highveld in the dying moments of the first Test and the winning try from Danny Cipriani’s cross-field kick in the third clash, dotting-down a ball he had no right to reach.Yet there are five better, so let the countdown begin…5. 2017, v ExeterOne thing you’ll notice about these tries is that Jonny May has a habit of making very good defenders look very very silly. Jack Nowell is probably the best defensive winger in the country – watching him tackle reminds you of why Eddie Jones has spoken of playing him in the back row.Not on this occasion. Gloucester were loitering with intent in the Exeter 22, when Cipriani spun out a typically fizzing pass to May, giving his wing a one-on-one chance against Nowell.May has a reputation as a joker off the pitch, happy to play the circus clown, but here he more resembled a jack-in-the-box – springing out to the left to give Nowell a nasty surprise.The Exeter man was caught on his heels, falling over like a cartoon character on a banana as May whizzed round the outside, leaving Nowell crocked on the floor, hoping that Eddie Jones has forgotten to set his TV to record that day.It was the final try of May’s first stint at Gloucester, and what a way to sign off.4. 2020, v FranceI’m cheating here slightly by picking two, but they really are the same tries cooked two ways. On both occasions May picked the ball up wide on the right with very little on, but single-handedly dragged England back into a game they had very little business being alive in.The first saw May take a Ben Youngs pass down the blindside, chipping the ball over Anthony Bouthier with the delicacy of a rose, before winning the race to it with the sharpness of a thorn, beating Teddy Thomas to the white line. The entire process from May first catching the ball to touching it down took only six seconds.Five minutes later and May was in that position again. He slowed for a moment, possibly convincing Vincent Rattez he was going to kick once more, before taking the outside space left to him, burning past Romain Ntamack. With the ease of an expert skier slaloming down a red run May sidestepped Thomas and Bouthier, scoring his second to bring England back to within touching distance at 24-14.These tries proved crucial – it was the losing bonus point eventually earned that day in Paris that secured England the Six Nations title eight months later. Wonder try: Jonny May touches down for his second try against Ireland (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Will you agree with Jacob Whitehead’s picks of the winger’s best scores? Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

23 Jun

Downtime with… Newcastle wing Adam Radwan

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the March 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Adam Radwan scores for Newcastle against Gloucester (Getty Images) The Falcons flyer discusses splurges, superstitions and state secrets Do you have any hobbies? I like to cook. I go fishing quite a lot too. In the summer I went up the coast a little bit. But I’ve been all over. Newcastle is quite a good place for it because you’ve got the sea, then you’ve obviously got the River Tyne. You can do all sorts round here. It’s relaxing, especially when the weather is good.So what do you cook when you want to impress? I know it sounds basic but I make the best cup of tea anyone’s ever had! I’ve also got a pizza oven so I’d make a nice pizza. Or a roast, depending on what they fancied.What are you like in adverse weather? The last few weeks it’s been freezing! Training or playing, I’ll always make sure I wear my Exosuit – their under-top helps with posture as well as keeping me warm – but it’s been like snow, rain, wind. It gets really cold.Any superstitions? I was thinking about this the other day, actually. I don’t have any superstitions, but… At half-time I’ll eat a packet of salt and vinegar McCoy’s crisps. Not a full packet, but basically sometimes I cramp up quite badly. I’ve looked into it loads and a few other athletes have done it, so at half-time I’ll eat half a bag. The first time I ever did it, Dean Richards gave me the funniest look ever. Downtime with… Newcastle wing Adam RadwanHow did you first pick up rugby? I stayed at a mate’s one night and he had rugby training the next day, so I just went with him. The first game I played was at No 8 and I didn’t have a clue what was going on, but my next game was on the wing and I ended up scoring seven tries or something like that. From then, I’ve stayed on the wing.Do you have any nicknames? Most call me ‘Raders’ but I’ve got quite big eyes, so I will get called ‘Ozil’ sometimes, like the footballer. Or ‘Goggle Eyes’ maybe.Which of your team-mates would you like to be for a day? Of all my current team-mates I’d like to be Toby Flood. I’d max out all of his credit cards. I’d just spend all of his money on whatever!What’s your biggest waste of money?We got quite addicted to Clash of Clans (the app) at the club and we had a little group. Every month we said that you had to subscribe. You had to be paying some money and buying stuff in it. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Who are your three dream dinner party guests?Probably Barack Obama because he seems pretty cool and I could ask him loads of interesting questions about stuff like Area 51 (a secret Nevada base). David Attenborough, because I really like nature. And then I should probably bring a comedian. Lee Evans is pretty funny.We have to ask about Area 51. Do you believe in aliens? Not really, but there must be loads of secrets we don’t know. Obama must know all that stuff, like who killed JFK. But back on Area 51, do you remember a few years ago when it was in the news that people were going to try to ‘storm’ Area 51? (Some internet personalities converged on an airstrip in the Nevada desert.) At the rugby club we had a discussion about if you were going to pick your team of five to ‘storm’ Area 51, who would you go for?And who did you go for? So my five was me, Gary Graham, Ben Stevenson, Tom Penny and Sean Robinson.What superpower would you like to have?It’s not really a superpower, but I’d like a portal gun like in Rick and Morty (so you can walk into anywhere). I would probably go somewhere like a bank’s vault first. Or maybe to Buckingham Palace? Nah, not there, definitely the bank vault.What’s the best bit of advice you’ve been given? Gary Graham told me to never kick a ball again in my life!Gary Graham, scoring for Newcastle, is one of the jokers at the club (Getty Images)Who’s your funniest team-mate? Well, the prop Jon Welsh thinks he’s pretty funny, but he probably is so I’ll give him that. He’s in my top three with Gary Graham and Jamie Blamire.Any practical jokes you can share? When Charlie Maddison came to the club as a new signing, he asked if anyone knew someone who could sort him with a car. I changed my WhatsApp to look like I was a car salesman and they gave him my number. I was sending him forms asking him stupid stuff like what his shoe size was.I worked it for a few days, even got him to send me a happy birthday voice note for my made-up child! We do it every year now to new guys. We’ve sold cars, tried to find a house to rent. All sorts.And finally, how would you like to be remembered? As someone quite fun and hard-working. And on the pitch as someone who scored a lot of tries.last_img read more

20 Jun

Need a doctor? Free church medical clinics offer hope, help

first_img Rector Tampa, FL By Pat McCaughanPosted Dec 8, 2011 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA John R. Huff Jr. says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rosemary Bagin says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector Knoxville, TN December 9, 2011 at 12:47 am While I admire these churches and volunteers trying to provide uninsured Americans with needed medical care, I find it hard to believe that a wealthy society such as the U.S. can’t do better. A system where everyone pays and everyone is eligible such as Medicare for All would be better. We keep hearing people talk about the Government would interfere with our freedom of choice. When someone is sick and their only choice is the hope that some kind hearted church folks have opened a clinic near them doesn’t sound like much of a choice or a good health care system. Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Health & Healthcare Comments (3) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC December 8, 2011 at 7:40 pm What a wonderful cause. I cannot think of anything more ennobling and worthy. Thanks for posting this. Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs October 15, 2012 at 11:43 pm All my life I have wanted to run a free clinic for the indigent. I live in Maryland and I think a bi monthly clinic on the Eastern Shore and on bordering western MD/PA/WV could serve many persons.I am committed to this idea, I have 40 yrs of nursing, I need help with a building, school, old church etc to run the clinic out of an all the ancillary help, financial, accounting, grant writer, minimal volunteer staff for two days a week bi monthly. Please write. Let’s talk. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Fran Schultz RN says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Patients line up for free medical services at St. Peter’s Church in Hillsdale, Michigan. Photo/St. Peter’s Clinic[Episcopal News Service] The parking lot fills quickly on Tuesday afternoons at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Brookings, Oregon as dozens of hopeful residents line up, take a number and wait their turn to see a doctor or other health-care provider.But first, they’re fed a hearty, healthy meal.“People can take a number, come eat lunch, and that’s the order in which we treat people” at the church’s free medical clinic and soup kitchen, said the Rev. Bernie Lindley, St. Timothy’s vicar, during a recent telephone interview from the church.Just about 18 months old, the clinic is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and has treated more than 575 patients, mostly the uninsured employed, some who live as far as 60 miles away, said Lindley.Like many other church-initiated free medical clinics across the country, St. Timothy’s began its outreach ministry “as a response to what we saw as a tremendous amount of need; we just didn’t know how we could respond until the opportunity presented itself,” Lindley said. The nearest hospital is at least 30 miles away, he added.At least a dozen Episcopal congregations throughout the country are meeting community needs by offering physical space, coordinating local resources, securing grant money and recruiting volunteers, and providing free medical services to the uninsured, according to Matthew Ellis, executive director of the National Episcopal Health Ministries.“For many, the lack of appropriate health insurance prevents them from addressing important health care needs; in these instances, faith-based health clinics may be one of the only options available,” Ellis said in a recent email to ENS. “Ministering to the sick is a fundamental ministry of the church, and it is heartening to see so many of our parishes addressing this critical need.”Historically Brookings, located about five miles north of the California border, was a timber town; the plywood mill its largest employer. Now, unemployment hovers at about 10 percent, more than half of the area’s 14,000 residents are retired and most of the clinic’s patients work in service sector, minimum-wage positions without health insurance, according to Lindley.“Everybody thinks it’s the guy panhandling on the corner or living under the bridge that needs us, but a lot of the people we see are partly employed or recently unemployed,” he said.Another misconception, say Lindley and other clinic providers, is that it takes a large or wealthy congregation to start a free medical clinic.With an average Sunday attendance of about 60 and a $58,000 annual budget, “the congregation doesn’t have tremendous resources,” Lindley said. They have expanded services to include a dental van, long-term mental health counseling, prescription assistance and numerous 12-step programs.“What we do have is the willingness to say yes to people who have a sense of social justice and who want to do ministry and to reach out to others within our community.“It’s very important we don’t exist for our own purpose. We need to exist for the betterment of the community,” he said.St. Peter’s Clinic in Hillsdale, Michigan, is another example of a small congregation serving up hope in huge doses.While average Sunday attendance at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church is about two dozen, its free medical clinic operates with about six times that many volunteers. There are doctors, physicians assistants, nurses, pharmacists, medical assistants, receptionists “and lay people of all kind,” said Jill Pavka, a retired nurse and the clinic’s executive director. There are about 120 active volunteers, she added.“They come from all over the community, they’re all different faiths or no faiths. It’s a huge mix of people who come here because they believe in the mission and what we do,” she added.On Tuesday evenings, the parish hall converts to a waiting room and the church basement becomes exam rooms. It takes about 24 people to staff the clinic, which averages about 60 patient visits per week, Pavka said.“We open our doors at 5 p.m., and many of them come straight from work,” she added.Terry Smith, 55, a resident of Reading, Michigan in Hillsdale County has been a regular clinic patient for the past two years.“Without the clinic,” she said emphatically in a recent telephone interview, “I’d be a dead duck.”The manicurist and mother of three developed diabetes two years ago. Through the clinic she receives medicine to regulate her blood pressure and cholesterol, and to treat her diabetes. She also receives the supplies she needs — a meter and test strips to monitor her blood glucose level three times daily.“My sugar is perfect now, but I do cheat once in a while,” said Smith, who also attends a monthly group at the clinic that offers education, awareness and support. “I know what can happen, you can go blind, or lose your feet. Diabetes does a lot to you if you don’t take care of your body,” she said.Employed full-time, Smith has no health insurance. “The economy has hit me so hard,” she said, calling health insurance “a luxury, so most people have had to give it up because of the economy.”“I don’t make enough to go pay a regular doctor or to pay my own insurance, so I’m forced to come here,” she said.But, she added: “It’s wonderful, because you don’t have to worry. They don’t make you feel like a piece of dirt because you have to come here, because you can’t help it.”Area unemployment surged in the community of about 40,000 after the auto industry tanked, according to Pavka. Manufacturing, tool and die and automotive-supply businesses “lost over 2,000 jobs in a two-year period of time,” she said. The unemployment rate is about 15 percent.“The people we see are the new poor, who had good jobs. They were making $12 to $20 per hour, decent money for a rural community like this, they had great benefits,” she said. “Then all of the sudden they found themselves with nothing.”To be eligible for the clinic’s services, patients must be uninsured with an income level at 200 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $44,700 annual income for a family of four. The clinic does not treat children, but they receive medical coverage under state programs. People 64 years and older typically can access Medicare.The number of patients visiting the clinic has increased each year since it opened in 2002.  All told, volunteers have handled more than 21,000 patient visits and dispensed $6.37 million in prescription medication, Pavka said. Although the clinic’s focus is on chronic disease management, acute care and providing medications, there has been an increase in patients with multiple health issues, she said.In 2009 (the latest year for which the statistics are tallied), the clinic referred 232 patients to other doctors, including surgeons, orthopedic surgeons and dentists. Ophthalmology and podiatry services are also available, along with a monthly diabetic clinic, depression support and weekly smoking-cessation groups.With an annual budget of $140,000, most funding comes from private donations, as well as the Diocese of Michigan’s social ministry fund and grants through health-insurance provider Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan.Still, Pavka is aware of a pressing need. “I’d love to find a way to serve the people we’re missing during the day,” she said, noting that people who work in the evening cannot come to the clinic.Linda Cosier, 62, a licensed practical nurse who volunteers at the clinic, said she’s been surprised at how much she receives in turn from patients. “Anyone who volunteers broadens themselves and becomes a lot better person,” she said. “Every Tuesday night we all learn from somebody who comes to the clinic asking for help.”A free medical clinic begun by a nearby congregation of about 40 people inspired St. James the Less Church in Ashland, Virginia, in 2006 to start its own clinic in the church basement, according to Lee Chambers, clinic board president and volunteer.The clinic has since expanded to include five separate locations in various churches, not all of them Episcopal, he said. “The demand exceeded the room we had at St. James and we had to move,” he said. “For example, we didn’t have enough room to put a chair in for the optical clinic, which requires a whole room. So we started looking for other space.”The St. James clinic is open Wednesdays from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. and offers eye, medical and dental services, prevention care and prevention education, said Chambers, 76, a retired chemical-industry marketing manager.Patients must be uninsured residents of Hanover County, Virginia, with income 150 percent of the current federal poverty guidelines.  But, “if you’re 66 and come in for glasses, obviously Medicare doesn’t pay for that,” said Chambers.Chambers finds volunteering extremely satisfying. He maintains equipment and registers patients for the dental clinic. In some instances, lives are changed, even saved, he said.“We have people who work at WalMart loading and unloading boxes,” he said. “When they get their teeth they say, ‘now I can get a promotion and work out front at the cash register and smile at people.’ It’s a great mission, a very great mission.”Another patient arrived with dangerously high blood pressure. “We don’t treat emergencies,” he said. “We immediately called the rescue squad; they took her to the hospital. She told us later the hospital said if we hadn’t reacted the way we did, she would have died. That visit changed her life.”Chambers hopes churches will consider tackling issues of the body, as well as the soul. The need for health education is so great that “even if churches don’t want to start up a free clinic, they could at least start with a series of seminars and see where that leads.— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Need a doctor? Free church medical clinics offer hope, help Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

20 Jun

Convention offers way to help bishops, dioceses reconcile

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 21, 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT General Convention 2012 Comments (2) charles daily says: Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls August 22, 2012 at 3:44 am The other change that the House of Bishops made, besides the 2/3 majority of standing committee or diocesan convention, was to make the decision to remove or not remove a bishop one the whole House of Bishops would make, not only the bishops with jurisdiction. This reflects the way our particular community of bishops lives and works. In other provinces, it is often only the diocesan bishops who conduct the business of their House.While I hope we never need this canon, it was necessary and salutary. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Convention offers way to help bishops, dioceses reconcile Canonical process prescribes method for ending episcopal relationship Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service] The bishops and deputies who gathered in Indianapolis in July for the 77th meeting of General Convention made a historic statement about the relationship between bishops and dioceses, acknowledging that, on rare occasions, that relationship becomes severely strained, sometimes to the point of breaking.The statement, made by way of Resolution B021, set up a canonical process for reconciling or dissolving an episcopal relationship.Resolution B021 was the result of a call (via Resolution B014) from the 2009 meeting of General Convention to how to help dioceses and bishops resolve their differences.“The Episcopal Church is relatively unique in that there is no pastoral or canonical mechanism for intervention by the church at large to bring reconciliation or dissolution to bear within conflicted dioceses,” Resolution B014 noted in its explanation. The toll of that lack is “enormous,” the explanation said, and comes in the form of “bishops and their families leaving stigmatized and without the gratitude and caring of the dioceses they have served, members of Standing Committees exhausted and ill-used, dioceses being left demoralized and split by factions, and the name of the church often compromised for lack of a more humane process.”“Several dioceses have experienced sustained enmity between bishops and primary ecclesiastical bodies which has sometimes lasted for years, and sometimes decades,” the explanation also noted.The process agreed to by this meeting of convention in B021 is akin to the mechanism for a parish that finds itself in serious conflict with its rector (Title III.9.12-13). It will be added to the “Of the Life and Work of a Bishop” canon of Title III, the church’s policies regarding ordained ministry. The addition becomes effective Sept. 1.It is intended for use, according to what will become Section 9 of that canon, when the relationship between a diocese and its bishop, bishop coadjutor or suffragan is “imperiled by disagreement or dissension” to the point where the bishop, two-thirds of the Standing Committee or a two-thirds majority vote of the Diocesan Convention deem the issues to be serious enough to invoke the process.“My guess is that the exercise of this canon will be rare, but in cases where it might be necessary, it could help spare undue damage to a diocese and the episcopal relationship,” Diocese of Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth, who proposed B021, told ENS in a recent interview. “Most likely, having the canon will incent a speedier resolution before having to invoke it.”If a diocese and bishop do decide to invoke the canon, such a decision allows any party to ask the presiding bishop to intervene and assist in resolving the disagreement or dissension. The presiding bishop then begins a process – including the possible use of a consultant or licensed mediator – meant to lead to reconciliation. If the parties agree to reconcile, they must define the “responsibility and accountability for the bishop and the diocese,” according to the new Section 9.In addition, the bishop, or two-thirds of the Standing Committee or a two-thirds majority vote of the Diocesan Convention can begin a process to dissolve the episcopal relationship. The reasons for the dissolution must be given in writing to the presiding bishop, along with a report of any mediator or consultant who might have been engaged. That notice sets in motion a series of steps that would last a matter of months. The presiding bishop may require further attempts at mediation and reconciliation.If there is still no resolution, a committee of one bishop (appointed by the presiding bishop) and one priest and one lay person (appointed by the president of the House of Deputies) from outside the diocese is to be convened to recommend a resolution of the matter. The committee could recommend that the episcopal relationship continue or that it should be dissolved.The recommendation would have to be approved by two-thirds of the members of the House of Bishops present and eligible to vote at the house’s next regularly scheduled or special meeting. If that majority does not agree, the committee would have to recommend another resolution to the same meeting, which would then be voted on at that meeting.“In terms of church time, this thing moves at lightning speed,” the Rev. Ledlie I. Laughlin, a Pennsylvania deputy and chair of the diocese’s Standing Committee, recently told ENS.Laughlin, who is the rector St. Peter’s Church in Philadelphia, said he followed the formulation of the eventually approved process “and was invited to participate in some of the conversations as edits were being made along the way.”The process laid out in the version of B021the convention approved is not the one with which the resolution began and it is also different from the one proposed in A065 by the Standing Commission on Ministry Development, also in response to B014.Hollingsworth said he and Diocese of New York Bishop Mark Sisk drafted the original version of B021 after a task force from Ministry Development presented its proposed process for reconciling or dissolving an episcopal relationship to the spring 2012 meeting of the House of Bishops. The proposal echoed the existing one for a parish and its rector.“I think everyone thought it was excellent work,” Hollingsworth said of the task force’s process, but “the concern was that it was a complex process and the worry was that it might take a long time, and be expensive.”Hollingsworth said he and Sisk came up with a more streamlined process and presented a rough draft to their colleagues during the same meeting. They got the OK to continue their work and so the two refined their proposal. They, along with Diocese of Massachusetts Bishop Thomas Shaw, submitted it to the General Convention.Once in Indianapolis, Hollingsworth said, the legislative Committee on Ministry asked a group of bishops and “some other interested people” to try to formulate one resolution to stand in for A065 and B021. That group “basically came up with a resolution that we as a group felt accomplished the hopes of everybody involved, it included clergy and lay people [in the process], and it was as expedient and efficient as we could make it,” he said.The measure went to the House of Bishops on July 10 where the members changed the majority votes needed throughout the process to a two-thirds margin.“The concern expressed by some bishops was that an issue of this gravity should require a super majority,” Hollingsworth told ENS. “I felt a simple majority was sufficient, but obviously the majority of the house felt that these decisions needed a super majority.”The House of Deputies concurred with the amended version of B021 on the last day of convention. The action came at a point in that day’s debate when deputies had agreed to limit their comment on resolutions. However, after the house’s vote, Laughlin from the Diocese of Pennsylvania asked for a moment of personal privilege to thank his colleagues for their prayers and “support for us to work through the divisive issues that we have been facing with our bishop.”The Pennsylvania Standing Committee has been at odds with Bishop Charles Bennison since the mid-2000s over concerns about how he managed the diocese’s assets and other issues.More than once the Standing Committee has called for Bennison’s resignation, including on the day he returned to work in August 2010 after the church’s Court of Review for the Trial of a Bishop overturned a lower church court’s finding that he ought to be removed from ordained ministry because he had engaged in conduct unbecoming a member of the clergy. The review court agreed with one of the lower court’s two findings of misconduct, but said that Bennison could not be deposed because the charge was barred by the church’s statute of limitations.In September 2010, the Standing Committee asked the House of Bishops for its “support and assistance” in securing Bennison’s retirement or resignation. The bishops later that month called for Bennison’s “immediate and unconditional resignation.” The next day, Bennison refused. He remains the diocesan bishop.Hollingsworth noted that the process General Convention added to Title III is not meant to replace the use of the church disciplinary canons for clergy and bishops known as Title IV. That collection of canons lists standards of conduct for clergy and outlines a process for handling accusations of clergy violating those standards. For a number of years, the canons of Title III have recognized that rectors and their parishes may find themselves in conflict for reasons that are not conduct violations. There was no canonical recognition of that possibility arising in the relationship between a bishop and a diocese until the recent action by convention.“If there are offenses that warrant Title IV then that title ought to be followed,” he said. “In the absence of an effective process for dealing with a compromised relationship between a bishop and a diocese, the only other route might be to find a way to deal with it through Title IV inappropriately, and that doesn’t help the diocese or the church or the bishop.”Laughlin told ENS that the Standing Committee discussed the new canonical process during a regularly scheduled meeting after General Convention, but that no decisions had been made.He added that it was clear from his conversations with the developers of the process that they “were careful not to link this too closely with the situation in the Diocese of Pennsylvania.”The process is focused on “our relationships with one another in the body of Christ and about how we keep that body healthy, and about how we hold one another mutually accountable,” said Laughlin.“It’s an acknowledgement that sometimes those relationships are broken, or are no longer mutually beneficial and as such no longer serve the mission of the church and the proclamation of the gospel,” he said. “The canon provides a means for the parties to address those issues so that they can get it sorted out and get on with the vital ministry to which we’re called”Meanwhile, another method suggested to help dioceses and their bishops discern their future together – a method that would have been an even greater departure from the traditional shape of that relationship – never made it out of the same General Convention committee that considered A053 and B021.The Rev. Alex Dyer, Connecticut, proposed in Resolution D041 to set a diocesan bishop’s term at nine years. The term could have been renewed by a vote of diocesan convention for an unlimited number of times. A bishop would have retained his or her episcopal orders if the diocese decided to end the relationship.Dyer told ENS that he liked the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s approach, which is to elect bishops to six-year renewable terms, and that his proposal was “not intended solely to get rid of a bishop.” Instead, it would have been a chance to “stop and look, and see if this [relationship] is a good thing.”“It is truly a mutual discernment,” Dyer said. “It’s not a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down.”He suggested that the last year of a term could have been used for a mutual ministry review that could have ended in a vote to renew or “a graceful way out.”“We need to constantly reevaluate our effectiveness in serving God’s mission,” he said. “Jesus wasn’t too big on complacency”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Pierre Whalon says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC August 21, 2012 at 4:06 pm The need for conflict resolution is paramount in a Christ-centered environment. It may be that the Office of the Bishop needs to be as subject to review and removal as any lay or other clerical leadership. It would be a check and balance system with a view towards pastoral concern for all involved if deployed with mercy and compassion. Who could object? Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

20 Jun

CREDO offers ‘Feeding and Fasting’

first_img Posted Jan 31, 2013 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL [CREDO] We celebrate a holy Lent both by taking on those disciplines that bring us closer to God, and shedding those indulgences, habits, and practices that steal our attention. There becomes during this liturgical season a holy interplay between feeding and fasting.Seems ironic, we sometimes are fed only by fasting – by denying ourselves that which distracts us from what is truly nourishing. When we fast, we clear out space for God. We forego the diversions that keep us occupied and instead make room inside for an expanding spirit, one that is nurtured in prayer and worship and the feast of love that is offered to us.This year, CREDO presents a series of reflections for Lent on feeding and fasting.Four different authors drawn from the diverse CREDO faculty write in prose and poetry about the season of Lent. Through their unique voices and reflection styles, Joe Chambers, Bud Holland, Molly O’Dell, and Winnie Varghese explore feeding and fasting.Join us this Lent for a full plate of insights. CREDO’s daily Feeding and Fasting reflections are available in both text and audio; some reflections will end with questions to ponder and some will conclude with a suggested practice.Sign up here.If you are interested in a facilitator’s guide comprised of the entire Lenten series in one PDF file, please be sure and check the facilitator’s guide box on your profile. CREDO offers ‘Feeding and Fasting’ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Lent last_img read more

20 Jun

Video: Guttie Kanjam describes life caught in Nuba Mountains conflict

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service — Chicago] Gutti Kanjam was taken from his birthplace in the Nuba Mountains as a boy and forced to live in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. He later lived as a refugee in Lebanon before being resettled in the United States. He is now studying government and international politics at George Mason University in Washington, D.C. And he advocates for Nuban youth. Culturally aligned with South Sudan, the Nuba Mountain region belongs to Sudan. – The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 22, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Africa, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Video Press Release Service Featured Events Video: Guttie Kanjam describes life caught in Nuba Mountains conflict Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Sudan & South Sudan, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

20 Jun

Canada: Welby explains gays and violence in Africa remarks

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rosser Bobbitt says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Marites N SisonPosted Apr 10, 2014 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Richard Taliaferro says: Hugh Magee says: Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Christopher Johnson says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector Bath, NC Josh Thomas says: Featured Jobs & Calls Jeremy Bates says: Jeremy Bates says: April 15, 2014 at 10:46 pm Archbishop Welby needs to address the question of provincial autonomy. Does he see the concept “global church” as valid ecclesiological description of the Anglican Communion, or is he willing to define the Communion as a voluntary fellowship of autonomous provinces? An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Comments (11) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Christopher Johnson says: April 17, 2014 at 9:02 pm “Claiming membership in an allegedly-ancient, international, Christian tradition demands accountability to the other members of that tradition.”No it doesn’t–not unless one is an authoritarian traditionalist!Both you and the Archbishop are assuming what you are trying to prove. He, of course, is trying to create more top-down control from London. By now he ought to understand that Episcopalians, in the US or elsewhere, will not abide that. I hope the TEC bishops made that clear in private conversation.Just because I am a member of a family doesn’t mean I canvas my cousins for majority approval before I do something. Canada: Welby explains gays and violence in Africa remarks The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group April 14, 2014 at 11:45 am Because the Archbishop of Canterbury, then and now, has been engaging in rank discrimination. Almost everyone understands that. If the present Archbishop disinvites Mary Glasspool from Lambeth 2018, then he will be vilified by his own flock and the London press.We didn’t “impose” Bishop Gene “on the rest of the Anglican world.” That’s the point. We made him a bishop in The Episcopal Church–not the Church of Nigeria. Last I heard, the bishops in Nigeria have no role in selecting bishops for The Episcopal Church, and we have not role in selecting their bishops. That is as it should be. The separate provinces could be conflated only if you assume that Anglicanism resembles Roman Catholicism. It doesn’t, of course: There is no single source of doctrine, and there is no central authority that can impose discipline on autonomous provinces.This organizational independence means that variations are bound to spring up among provinces. Like it or not, The Episcopal Church is a thought leader and an early adapter within the Anglican Communion family. The principle that we can disagree with other Anglican provinces, and innovate in ways that affect ourselves, is very well established.Your reasoning would have prevented The Episcopal Church from ordaining women. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 10, 2014 at 11:32 pm He’s so busy running the Church of England into the ground I’m surprised he has any time for travel. Two wrongs don’t make a right, Justin – three wrongs, now that you’ve piped up. April 11, 2014 at 9:07 pm Really want to go there? Then explain to me why Gene Robinson and his supporters were so angry when Rowan Williams barred him from the last Lambeth Conference. According to you, “theo-political imperialism” is a really bad thing so the Episcopal Church shouldn’t have been allowed to impose Robinson on the rest of the Anglican world. Nothing could be less Anglican.Yet TEC insisted upon it then and still does today. But you and I both know that you can’t have it both ways. You’re either part of an international Christian tradition or you’re not. If you claim that you are, then you have certain obligations to others who share that tradition but who may have committed the unpardonable sin of disagreeing with you. If you no longer wish to be “Anglican,” then the sky’s the limit. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Christopher Johnson says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jeremy Bates says: Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Archbishop of Canterbury Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Archbishop Fred Hiltz met for two hours at the convent of Sisters of St. John the Divine in Toronto. Photo: Michael Hudson[Anglican Journal] After a 12-hour day of back-to-back engagements, a jet-lagged Justin Welby, the 105th archbishop of Canterbury, sat down for a 15-minute interview with the Anglican Journal late Tuesday evening, April 8.Welby and his wife, Caroline, arrived in Toronto Monday afternoon for a one and a half day “personal, pastoral visit,” his first, to the Anglican Church of Canada. Welby, whose area of expertise includes conflict resolution, has said that these visits are part of a process for getting to know the primates (senior archbishops) and their churches. The Anglican Communion, which has been struggling with divisions over the issue of sexuality, has about 80 million members in 143 countries. Including Canada, the archbishop has visited 17 of the Communion’s 37 provinces and aims to visit them all by the end of the year or early 2015. He arrived April 9 in Oklahoma City, to visit The Episcopal Church.Excerpts:Q: How would you describe your first visit to the Anglican Church of Canada? What have you learned about this church that has been most unexpected?A: Two things have been unexpected, that have been striking. One is the depth of commitment to the truth and reconciliation process, which I didn’t realize quite how deep that went into the life of the church. And, also, the commitment of the church to support the Council of the North dioceses…That’s all part of the same sense of commitment to those who the church has damaged or who are on the edge. The other thing that’s struck me has been the commitment to the Five Marks of Mission and that these are very much part of the strategy of the church, and that’s the vision of the church. Q: You mentioned in your dinner remarks that your conversation with the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, has been most useful in terms of how to move forward in the Communion.A: We had two hours together and I find him a particularly helpful, thoughtful and challenging interlocutor, and someone who seems to be able to unlock and unpick issues that were weighing on my mind and to…enable more creativity. I don’t know if that’s part of his life as primate, but I felt that, as a result of the conversation, I was more creative than I was before it. Q: Could you give us a sense of what you talked about? A: There were these obvious things. We talked about the challenge of diversity in the Communion, that we have such breathtaking diversity across the Communion, that it’s a massive task to even think about how we can relate to each other effectively. We talked quite a lot about the companion dioceses and the value they are…the depth they get into. Q: In 2016, the church’s General Synod will be presented with a resolution changing the marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage. Is this a cause for concern?A: That’s a really tough question. Well, it’s got to be a cause for concern because this is a particularly tough issue to deal with…And, I hope that two or three things happen: I hope that the church, in its deliberations, is drawing on the wealth of its contribution to the Anglican Communion and the worldwide church, to recognize…the way it works and how it thinks, to recognize the importance of its links. And that, in its deliberations, it is consciously listening to the whole range of issues that are of concern in this issue. We need to be thinking; we need to be listening to the LGBT voices and to discern what they’re really saying because you can’t talk about a single voice anymore than you can with any other group. There needs to be listening to Christians from around the world; there needs to be listening to ecumenical partners, to interfaith partners. There needs to be a commitment to truth in love and there needs to be a commitment to being able to disagree in a way that demonstrates that those involved in the discussions love one another as Christ loves us. That’s the biggest challenge, that in what we do, we demonstrate that love for Christ in one another. Q: Some people have reacted strongly to your statements about the issue of gay marriage in your interview with LBC radio.A: Lots of people have. Q: Were you in fact blaming the death of Christians in parts of Africa on the acceptance of gay marriage in America?A: I was careful not to be too specific because that would pin down where that happened and that would put the community back at risk. I wouldn’t use the word “blame”— that’s a misuse of words in the context. One of the things that’s most depressing about the response to that interview is that almost nobody listened to what I said; they mostly imagined what they thought I said…It was not only imagination, it was a million miles away from what I said. Q: So what exactly were you saying? A: What I was saying is that when we take actions in one part of the church, particularly actions that are controversial, that they are heard and felt not only in that part of the church but around the world…And, this is not mere consequentialism; I’m not saying that because there will be consequences to taking action, that we shouldn’t take action. What I’m saying is that love for our neighbour, love for one another, compels us to consider carefully how that love is expressed, both in our own context and globally. We never speak the essential point that, as a church, we never speak only in our local situation. Our voice carries around the world. Now that will be more true in some places than in others. It depends on your links. We need to learn to live as a global church in a local context and never to imagine that we’re just a local church. There is no such thing.Q: You’ve said the issue of same-sex marriage is a complex one that you wrestle with every day and often in the middle of the night…A: I have about a million questions. I think really I’ve said as much as I want to on that subject. Q: You recently released a video collaboration with Cardinal Vincent Nichols. What was the impetus for that?A: It came about in the discussions we were having together. We meet together to discuss and pray quite regularly and out of that came the sense that we ought to do something public and visible that demonstrated what the church is already doing, to draw attention to that and that we’re centered both in prayer and social action. Q: Is there an Easter message you’d like to give to Canadian-Anglicans?A: I would say that at the heart of my own thinking as we approach Easter is to recall the joy that is in the risen Christ. Q: Is it harder for you now to be on Twitter because you’re the Archbishop of Canterbury? A: Yes. Q: Are you less candid?A: I’m not necessarily less candid. It’s very interesting with social media, isn’t it? Every day I get loads of questions directed at me through a Twitter message—everything from “What’s your favourite book?” to “Are you really saying…whatever?” Sadly, there’s really no way I can respond to those—it’s just impossible. I would do nothing else all day, and then I wouldn’t get through it. One of the things I find difficult is ignoring responses to things that are tweeted because everything in me wants to respond to the people who’ve responded to me. But it’s just not possible. The other thing is that you just become aware of the dark side of all these things: that people feel that they can write things about other people, and not just about myself, which are really horrible. And so I have to say there are moments when you think, “I just don’t know if I want to put up something on social media because it will just unleash a torrent of abuse from some people.” But in the end you think, “Well, I won’t read it…there’s no point… I’m just going to get on with life.” Q: Do you still compose your own tweets? A: Yes. Q: You don’t have a minder doing that for you?A: No, no. I said it’s got to be authentic. It’s got to be me; that’s why there are sometimes gaps. I’ll go through a few days where nothing particularly occurs to me or I’m traveling. I’m not on Twitter today—I might just manage it today before I go to sleep. Some days, lots of things happen; other days, my mind is a perfect blank… Q: You also need to be kind to yourself.A: I do know about that, but you at least have to know when you’re going to bore people stiff. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. April 10, 2014 at 8:40 pm “Q: Were you in fact blaming the death of Christians in parts of Africa on the acceptance of gay marriage in America?”Wouldn’t the right answer to this question be “no”?Unless he was, in fact, placing responsibility for the death of Christians in Africa on the acceptance of gay marriage in America. Well? Were you, Your Grace?And would someone please remind the Archbishop that the Anglican Communion is NOT, as he puts it, a “global church”? He has no authority here. He has no authority in Africa. The sooner he acknowledges these facts, the better.Indeed, because the Anglican Communion is not a global church, Episcopalians do not “need to learn to live as a global church” under Canterbury’s direction. The idea that the Anglican Communion is a “global church” is complete nonsense.It also smacks of self-serving English imperialism. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Jeremy Bates says: April 17, 2014 at 1:18 am So, Jeremy Bates, I guess western Anglicans have absolutely no business whatsoever complaining about Ugandan and Nigerian Anglican episcopal support for the so-called “anti-gay” legislation passed in those two countries. After all, what happens inside Uganda and Nigeria is the business of Uganda and Nigeria and no one else.My (and Archbishop Welby’s) original point still stands. Claiming membership in an allegedly-ancient, international, Christian tradition demands accountability to the other members of that tradition. Otherwise, you’re just Unitarians who dress funny. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ April 11, 2014 at 3:16 am So Gene Robinson was never an Anglican bishop then? Good to know. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 11, 2014 at 11:16 am The whole point of being Anglican is that foreign prelates do not have jurisdiction in other provinces. That was the principle on which Henry VIII founded the Church of England as a church independent from Rome. That is the principle on which The Episcopal Church ordained Gene Robinson and Mary Glasspool.The attempt by two successive Archbishops of Canterbury to mis-portray a family of independent churches as one “global church” — headquartered in, where else, London — is nothing more than a transparent power grab by Englishmen pining for erstwhile imperial influence.Lambeth should cease forthwith these foolish attempts at theo-political imperialism. Nothing could be less Anglican. April 10, 2014 at 5:04 pm Thank goodness we have a man of this intelligence at the helm! Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN April 10, 2014 at 5:11 pm Now this really clarifies his thinking!I said what I meant and I meant what I said and it’s been misintrepteted.So, what is your position?I think I’ve said enough on the subject.GIVE ME A BREAK!!!!!!At least he isn’t telling us what to do, only suggesting. But he can tell the homophobes: “I’ve done my best but you know those obstreperous North Americans!” Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more