19 Dec

Your Body Needs Its Nature Medicine

first_imgTrapping yourself indoors most of the day? Studies show that health improves with outdoor experiences in nature.Dose of nature is just what the doctor ordered (Medical Xpress). Australian and UK scientists found that people have better blood pressure and mental health when they visit parks 30 minutes or more each week. Given the urban pressures causing heart disease, stress, anxiety and depression, “savings to public health budgets across all health outcomes could be immense.”Get children playing outdoors to improve academic success and reduce obesity (Science Daily). Kids addicted to screens? Show them some reality outdoors and get their weight off. A study in Scotland showed that kids playing video games all day had multiple health problems. Health scientists recommend Unplug & Play: “Play benefits children in helping them to develop socially and emotionally, so promoting active outdoor play would have many benefits in addition to improving physical activity, improving academic attainment, and reducing obesity.”Running barefoot helps optimize technique, reduces risk of injury, study shows (Science Daily). Ever think about what the first humans experienced before shoes were invented? Except when walking around cactus or sharp rocks, they probably were more athletic. Barefoot running, while controversial, is still trending upward for scientific reasons.Barefoot running appears to contribute to the acquisition of a more efficient biomechanical running pattern, allowing contact between the foot and the ground to begin in the metatarsal area (forefoot strikes). The use of standard modern footwear appears to favour the opposite technique; initiating contact with the ground at the heel area with a rearfoot strike, which produces significant impact peaks that negatively affect the runner’s health and athletic performance.If these stories inspire you to become more active, here are some recent articles about exercise and health from Live Science.Will Staying Hydrated Help with Weight Loss? (Live Science)Meet Your Muscles: 6 Remarkable Human Muscles (Live Science)The 4 Types of Exercise You Need to Be Healthy (Live Science). Includes links to more detailed articlesModern conveniences are helpful, but not if they rob us of good health. We have innate capabilities that are tuned for interaction with nature. They do best when we connect them to their natural environment.Both creationists and evolutionists realize that the human body was designed to handle a wide variety of outdoor situations. Be all that you can be; explore your design!(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

17 Dec

Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet highlights

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet was held in January in Lewis Center at the Nationwide Hotel and Conference Center. More than 200 attended the event that offered educational breakout sessions, several new youth opportunities, the annual meeting, and evening banquet.“We got an update from Washington, D.C. We heard about where we stand on the electronic logging devices, which is a big issue for a lot of our members and we talked about water quality issues. We also had our first annual youth quiz bowl and we had 42 individuals participate. We are trying to get some more of the youth involved in what we are doing here,” said Sasha Rittenhouse, the new Ohio Cattlemen’s Association president. “One of the biggest things I am looking forward to as president is giving back to an association that I truly believe benefits every single beef producer in the state. The OCA does so many things that a lot of people do not realize. We go to the State House and Washington, D.C. when there are issues trying to put a face with a name. We want to make sure they realize that, though there are not many of us, we are feeding people around the world.”Meeting attendees heard from industry resource speakers including Alvaro Garcia Guerra with Ohio State University talking about pregnancy loss in beef cattle. Other featured speakers at the event included Cathann Kress, dean of the OSU College of Food Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, John Foltz, chair of the OSU Department of Animal Sciences, and Colin Woodall, with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, who offered insights into issues at the federal level.“The overall attitude when you look at the beef cattle industry is one where the current administration cares a little bit more about what we have to say. That has been encouraging for us with any number of issues right now. Having an administration that wants to talk with us and help to fix our problems has made 2017 a whole lot better. We look forward to more wins in 2018. With what you hear in the national media it sounds like a bunch of chaos, but from a beef cattle perspective it has been a good year,” Woodall said. “There were two huge wins for us in 2017. One was the rollback of EPA’s WOTUS rule and the other was re-opening China to U.S. beef. Both of those we had spent over a decade working on.“Of course the President has made it clear that he wants to renegotiate NAFTA. As long as we don’t touch the beef and cattle trade provisions we are fine with that. It has worked really well since that agreement has been put into place and we have to maintain our access to Canada and Mexico that are both in our top five for export markets. Our domestic herd is growing and we have to be able to move that product. Having access to Canada and Mexico is a key component of that.”Another issue is a battle over food product labeling.“We do not want the vegetable-based products or lab test tube-based products to be able to use our terminology like beef or hamburger. We don’t mind if people want to find new ways to produce protein we just don’t want them to use our nomenclature because we have worked hard to build the names around our business and we don’t want the consumer to ever be confused,” Woodall said. “We are also going to continue to work on trade access to maintain the agreements we have and open up new markets. We have some work left on the environmental side too. There are still rules and regulations left over from the Obama Administration that we have left to fix. We hope to push forward to get a farm bill done before the current one expires in September.”In addition, awards were presented including: Gerber Farms, Middletown, Ohio — Commercial Producer of the Year; J & L Cattle Service, Jeromesville — Seedstock Producer of the Year; Kyle Nickles, Sycamore — Young Cattleman of the Year; Representative Brian Hill, Zanesville — Industry Service; Gibbs Farms, Maplewood — Environmental Stewardship; and E.R. Boliantz Co., Ashland — Industry Excellence.Fourteen scholarships were presented to outstanding youth during the luncheon. Josh Dickson, Licking County; Kady Davis, Carroll County and Meredith Oglesby, Highland County, received the $1,000 Cattlemen’s Gala scholarship, funded by the 2017 inaugural event. Cole Liggett, Tuscarawas County; Emily Horst, Wayne County; McKayla Raines, Adams County and Erica Snook, Noble County were awarded $1,000 Tagged for Greatness Scholarships, which are funded with the sales of the Ohio Beef license plate.Desirae Logsdon, Fairfield County; Garret Stanfield, Adams County; Caitlyn Gaddis, Knox County and Evan Smith, Fairfield County, received a $1,000 Country Club Scholarship, which was funded by the putt-putt course at the 2017 Ohio State Fair.Hannah Frobose, Wood County, was awarded the $1,000 William Cleland Memorial scholarship. Natalie Wagner, Brown County, was awarded the Saltwell Expo scholarship, funded by the Saltwell Western Store and Ohio Beef Expo, that will be presented at the 2018 Ohio Beef Expo in March.   Colin Woodall, NCBA Young Cattleman Award winner Kyle Nickles from Ashland and Wayne counties Industry Service Award winner State Rep. Brian Hill from Muskingum County Seedstock Producer of the Year winners Jeff and Lou Ellen Harr of J&L Cattle Services of Ashland County Environmental Stewardship winners Chris and Jason Gibbs from Shelby and Logan counties Commercial Producer of the Year Gary Gerber and family from Butler County Sasha Rittenhouse, the new Ohio Cattlemen’s Association president Joe Foster hands the gavel to Sasha Rittenhouse, the current Ohio Cattlemen’s Association president. Industry Excellence Award winner Bob Boliantz of E.R. Boliantz Co. packing company in Ashland.last_img read more

7 Nov

Roosters NRL Touch Premiership coaches

first_imgNRL Touch Football is excited to announce the head coaches for the Roosters 2019 NRL Touch Premiership teams.Australian Mixed Open head coach Mick Lovett will lead the female program and Youth World Cup-winning coach Dave Nolan will take the reins of the men.TFA in conjunction with our newly appointed head coaches will now start a search for suitable support staff including assistant coaches before commencing the process of selecting teams.As the current Australian Mixed Open head coach and being Melbourne-based, Mick Lovett is the logical choice to lead our Roosters women’s team. TFA looks towards ensuring a pathway for alliance coaches as well as players so there will be a focus on finding assistant coaches from our Alliance states to support these teams.Pictured below: Dave Nolan (left) and Mick Lovett (right) at the Touch Football 50th Anniversary Dinner, December 2018last_img read more

28 Oct

15 days agoPrandelli: Why Giampaolo failed with AC Milan

first_imgPrandelli: Why Giampaolo failed with AC Milanby Carlos Volcano15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Italy coach Cesare Prandelli feels for Marco Giampaolo after his dismissal by AC Milan.Prandelli says the players were not up to Giampaolo’s demands.“Seeing the team from the outside, I did develop a theory as to why things went so wrong,” Prandelli told La Gazzetta dello Sport.“Giampaolo loves a reasoned-out style of football that follows certain patterns, whereas all their players are instinctive and don’t follow tactics.“It becomes difficult at that point to find some common ground. Having said all that, Giampaolo 100 per cent deserves his tag as a great Coach in Italian football, it’s just this squad didn’t suit his ideas.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

18 Oct

DUSU removes busts of Savarkar others from campus

first_imgNew Delhi: The ABVP-led Delhi University Students’ Union has removed the busts of V D Savarkar, Bhagat Singh and Subhash Chandra Bose from the campus, the student outfit said in a statement on Saturday. The ABVP, however, claimed that the Delhi University has assured them that the busts will be reinstalled in accordance with the procedure after the DUSU polls are concluded. The busts of the trio were installed on August 20 by outgoing DUSU president Shakti Singh without taking permission from the varsity authorities. They were removed on the intervening night of Friday and Saturday. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder “ABVP-led DUSU has removed the busts of Veer Savarkar, Bhagat Singh and Subhash Chandra Bose till permission is obtained from the DU Administration. The busts have been kept (at a) safe (place) by the varsity,” the RSS-affiliated outfit said in a statement. Earlier, the ABVP had asked DUSU office-bearers to install the statues as per the procedure, it claimed. The students’ body also demanded “stringent legal action” against members of the Congress-affiliated National Students’ Union of India (NSUI) for allegedly blackening the bust of Savarkar on Thursday. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchings The ABVP claimed left-affiliated student organisations along with AAP’s CYSS and the NSUI had “stooped to a low level” and were harming the “the culture of debate and discussion, prevalent in the university”. “ABVP strongly believes that the Left, AAP and the student organisations affiliated to the Congress should stop insulting freedom fighters to meet their trivial political interests,” it said. ABVP Delhi’s State Secretary Sidharth Yadav said: “It is very unfortunate that the DU administration turned a deaf ear to DUSU’s demand for installation of busts of freedom fighters, for a very long time. The university should restore these idols, as per their assurances, at the earliest.” The manner in which other student organisations have carried out such extremely unfortunate acts reveal the real and degraded mindset of these student organisations towards freedom fighters, the repercussions of which they will face in the times to come, he added. “At the same time, the Congress should understand that its ‘Kaalikh model’ is not going to hide the reality. We have decided to remove the busts because we don’t want to do politics over the name of freedom fighters,” he said. No immediate reaction was available from the university.last_img read more

18 Oct

ED slaps Rs 229 cr FEMA show cause penalty against PwC

first_imgNew Delhi: The ED has slapped an over Rs 229-crore FEMA violation show cause penalty notice against multi-national accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), officials said on Friday. They said the notice was issued under the Foreign Exchange Management Act (FEMA) after completion of probe by the adjudicating authority which is the Special Director (Eastern Region) of the Enforcement Directorate. The penalty is amounting to $4,98,42,747 which is equivalent to Rs 2,29,67,21,906, the order accessed by PTI said. Officials said the company along with other noticees received investments from Ms PricewaterhouseCoopers Services BV by “falsely” showing them as ‘grants’ so as to avoid attracting provisions of FEMA which require approval of the government or to say the Reserve Bank of India.last_img read more

13 Oct

Collapsed Mexico school raises questions about quake codes

first_imgMEXICO CITY – On paper at least, the Mexico City school appeared to be structurally sound and built to withstand a major earthquake. But it collapsed, killing 26 people, most of them children. And now authorities are looking into whether an apartment reportedly built on top of the two-story school was to blame.Claudia Sheinbaum, the borough president of the southern Mexico City district where the school went down in the 7.1 magnitude quake, told a news conference Tuesday that the school appeared to have its paperwork in order, at least according to documents filed by architects and engineers who supposedly inspected the structure. She said an investigation was being launched to look for any abnormalities not revealed in those documents.“We can’t stop just with the paperwork,” Sheinbaum said. “We are going to do a review of the building itself.”Authorities said that the owner of the privately owned Enrique Rebsamen school built an apartment for herself on top of the collapsed wing, which local media said included a Jacuzzi, and were looking into whether the extra weight may have played a role in the collapse.Sheinbaum said she didn’t know if that was true, but said the owner, Mónica García Villegas, had a permit dating back to 1983 to build a school and apartments on the lot, though it was unclear whether she had permission to add a third story to the section of the school that collapsed.The school was just one of dozens of buildings that collapsed in the Sept. 19 quake that killed at least 333 people, 194 of them in Mexico City. Questions have been raised about whether new building standards put in place after a 1985 quake that killed 9,500 people had been adequately followed.Although construction began on the school in 1983 — two years before the new codes went into effect — it was expanded over the next 34 years with no evidence of noncompliance, Sheinbaum said. She said the only immediately evident paper work problems during that time were two cases of unregistered expansion work, and Garcia Villegas paid a fine for not registering the work and was allowed to proceed.On Tuesday, Meyer Klip Gervita, head of the Institute of Administrative Verification, said that earlier this year authorities had asked the school to stop operating because no record of its zoning permit could be found. But the school appealed and remained open while the case made its way through court. The apparent violation was not enough to force the school’s closure. The institute was created to ensure compliance with city building ordinances among other responsibilities.Phone calls to a number registered to Garcia Villegas, who was pulled alive from the rubble, rang unanswered.Seismologists and engineers say the Mexico City buildings most at risk in a quake are those, like the school building, that were built atop an Aztec-era lake bed, where the muddy soil can amplify earthquake waves.But, although an architect signed a document certifying the school was structurally sound, experts questioned the method used to evaluate it, which Sheinbaum said involved piling sandbags on its upper floors to simulate 85 per cent of the structure’s maximum design-carrying weight, and then measuring the resulting floor sag.Kit Miyamoto, a structural engineer and California Seismic Safety Commissioner, said sandbags can’t test for earthquake resistance.“Seismic is a lateral force, so if you just put a whole bunch of sandbags it is not going to tell you the story of the seismic capacity of the building at all,” Miyamoto said. “You can do testing, to determine what kind of reinforcement” a building has, including ground-penetrating radar or exposing rebar.The school’s first wing was built in 1983, but other additions and floors were added over the years, said Francisco Garcia Alvarez, president of the Mexican Society of Structural Engineers, who evaluated the school site after its collapse.A third floor appeared to have been added recently to the original 1983 structure that was toppled in the quake, raising questions about what construction permits, if any, the school had obtained, how recently it had been inspected and what architectural plans were submitted in the first place. Paper work filed as recently as June by a private architect working for the school asserted that the parcel had not been modified in a way that would violate the permitted land use.The quake, whose epicenter was only about 100 miles from the capital, hit the city’s south side where the school is located with a force much stronger than the original school structure was built to withstand in the early 1980s, Garcia Alvarez said.That caused a failure in the building’s joints where the columns met the beams, he said, noting that the addition of a third floor would have added more weight to the structure. Still, he said, its possible role in the collapse needed further study.Sheinbaum, who is widely expected to run for mayor, faces heightened political scrutiny over the school’s collapse, which killed 19 children and seven adults, leaving behind a pile of wreckage still visible in a cordoned-off street of the leafy neighbourhood manned by soldiers.“We all just keep working, but then all of a sudden it hits you,” said Alfonso Martinez, one of hundreds of volunteers who have been ferrying shovels, hard hats, food and water to rescue workers since the earthquake struck last week. “People are going in and out of grief about all the lives that were lost.”Neighbours said that the school had grown quickly over the years and they had noted new construction. “We saw there was a third floor put on there but we didn’t suspect someone was living there,” said Juan Antonio Gudino. “I just thought it was an office.”Across Mexico City, some 40 buildings collapsed in the earthquake and some 500 others were so severely damaged they will either have to be demolished or receive major structural reinforcement, according to Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera. Another 1,300 are reparable, and about 10,000 buildings inspected so far were found to be habitable.Still, experts stressed that reforms to building codes following the 1985 earthquake had lowered the number of casualties. But, they said, more needed to be done to ensure compliance.“From what we can tell the new codes worked well, and helped avoid more harm,” said Eduardo Miranda, a professor in Stanford University’s civil and structural engineering department, who evaluated buildings following the quake. “But some of these buildings may have failed because people did not follow the codes.”Unlike in the United States, where city engineers typically check architectural drawings for structural integrity, authorities in Mexico City perform an administrative check of submitted plans, but don’t vet structural calculations, he said.Two blocks from the school, bouquets of white chrysanthemums line a makeshift memorial with the names of those pulled from the wreckage — a reminder of the tragedy that befell the school.“We were all focused on following the code,” Sheinbaum said. “We are all asking ourselves if we could have done more.”___Associated Press writer Mark Stevenson contributed to this report.last_img read more

13 Oct

Toronto stock market near flat and loonie up with US markets closed

first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s main stock index finished on a near flat note Thursday, as U.S. stock markets were closed for their Thanksgiving holiday.The S&P/TSX composite index scraped out 0.72 of a point to advance to 16,074.30.Earlier in the day, the materials and energy sectors had helped push the Toronto market up modestly, as the health-care and consumer staples groups lost ground.“The positive performance this morning was the result of the resource sector. Both energy and materials were stronger on the day,” said Candice Bangsund, vice-president and portfolio manager at Fiera Capital.“In energy markets we’re seeing encouraging signs toward the rebalancing of the crude market. So we saw energy prices soar to a two-year high this week after a report that indicated a decline in U.S. stockpiles, while there’s also been a disruption in the Keystone pipeline that has helped to sort of boost that optimism that the market is going to find a better balance.”In currency markets, the Canadian dollar was trading at an average price of 78.65 cents US, up 0.09 of a U.S. cent. That marked the loonie’s third straight day of gains.Key drivers of the currency’s recent upswing are the weakening U.S. dollar and bullishness around the price of oil, which rose $1.19 at the closing of markets Wednesday.Commodities markets were also closed for the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday.On the Canadian marijuana front, Aurora Cannabis Inc.’s (TSX:ACB) stock was up about five per cent amid news that the Vancouver-headquartered pot producer intends to use its ownership of greenhouse design firm Larssen Ltd. to pressure other cannabis producers to enter partnerships that will further its aggressive growth plans.In a news release, Aurora said Larssen is involved with more than 15 cannabis industry clients globally, including five Canadian licensed producers. Shares of Aurora gained 32 cents or about five per cent to close at $6.74 on Thursday.In economic news, Statistics Canada reported retail sales in September were up 0.1 per cent to $49.1 billion for the month, boosted by sales at gasoline stations as prices climbed due to disruptions caused by hurricane Harvey.Economists however said it appears consumer spending has cooled after a hot start to the year.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

13 Oct

NEATs 2018 Community Can donates over 600 jars to Peace Region food

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Volunteers with the Northern Environmental Action Team were busy canning over the summer for members of the community who are in need.NEAT said that Fort St. John residents came together during two canning sessions to prepare 628 jars filled with applesauce, berry jam, pickled carrots and beans, stewed herbed tomatoes, relish, and other preserved foods that were donated to local food banks. Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team presenting Community Can donations to the Salvation Army. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team presenting Community Can donations to the Salvation Army. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team bringing Community Can donations to the Women's Resource Society. Supplied photo Members of the Northern Environmental Action Team bringing Community Can donations to the Women’s Resource Society. Supplied photo Food security is a growing concern in the Peace Region area where prices can be much higher than elsewhere across the country.NEAT says that teaching food preservation skills and providing healthy donations to outreach organizations can help shed light on these issues.NEAT extended thanks to the North Peace Savings & Credit Union and Enbridge for their support of its Community Can initiative, as well as to those members of the community who donated locally-grown fruits and vegetables, their time and their canning skills to make the Community Can a huge success this year.“The Community Canning Program has been a wonderful support to The Fort St. John Food Bank,” said the Salvation Army’s executive director Cameron Eggie. “It pleases our volunteers & staff to be able to give out a healthy-homemade product and it really makes our guests feel supported by their community. Thank you NEAT!”last_img read more

13 Oct

Thieves broke into Action Property and left empty handed

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At 5:07 am, caught on surveillance camera what appears to be two thieves entering Action Property trying to rob the establishment.Wanda Smook shares with me they had just driven by the business 10 minutes prior to the break-in and there was no one there at that time.“The thieves broke in which immediately triggered our alarm system and Vivint called the RCMP. My maintenance man attended and determined that nothing was missing,” said Smook, “The thieves went straight to the lockbox so they were hoping to find money there I believe. Finding none and with the alarms going off they left.” If you have any information regarding this incident please call the Fort St. John RCMP a 250-787-8100. Should you wish to remain anonymous, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or submit a tip online.last_img read more