19 Jan

National anthem will be hot topic at NFL owners meetings

first_imgLATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew FILE – In this Oct. 2, 2016, file photo, San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Eli Harold, left, quarterback Colin Kaepernick, center, and safety Eric Reid kneel during the national anthem before the team’s NFL football game against the Dallas Cowboys in Santa Clara, Calif. Kaepernick accepted Sports Illustrated’s Muhammad Ali Legacy Award from Beyonce on Tuesday night, Dec. 5, 2017, and promised that “with or without the NFL’s platform, I will continue to work for the people.” Beyonce thanked Kaepernick for his “personal sacrifice,” and 2016 Ali Award winner Kareem Abdul-Jabbar called Kaepernick a “worthy recipient” during a video tribute.(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)ORLANDO, Fla. — The national anthem is going to be a hot topic at the NFL owners meetings.Just don’t expect any far-ranging decisions to be made.ADVERTISEMENT “We’re going to deal with it in such a way, I think, that people will understand that we want everybody to respect our country, respect our flag,” McNair said Sunday. “And our playing fields, that’s not the place for political statements.“Fans are upset about it. The fans are our customers. You can replace the owners and the league would survive. You can replace the players, although the game won’t be as good. You can’t replace the fans. If you don’t have the fans, you’re dead.”Johnson was more willing to search for answers to the anthem issue while also not wanting the players’ messages to be lost. He doesn’t favor seeing the policy changed to having the players remain in the locker room until after the anthem is played, which has been discussed.“I think that’s a particularly bad idea,” Johnson said.What about changing the language to the players must stand?“I don’t agree with that either, but I’m only one of 32 owners,” he added. “I think that the Jets had a pretty great thing happen last year around the anthem. I think there was an understanding between me and the players that we could use our position – rightly or wrongly, people pay attention to teams and athletes – but we could use our position to get some great stuff done off the field. I think we have done some great things off the field.”Another off-field topic is the sale of the Carolina Panthers. Jerry Richardson announced in December that he was selling following allegations of workplace misconduct.“He’s going to sell the team,” McNair said of the 81-year-old Richardson. “He’s had all kinds of health problems. … I don’t know all the details, but I know he has some good prospective buyers that appear to be qualified.”As for investigations into Richardson’s behavior, McNair defended his fellow owner, also citing instances when the Texans faced similar accusations.“I understand what he’s saying,” McNair said. “Sometimes people choose to try to make something go away rather than fighting. I think his regret is he didn’t fight some of these things. In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback “We got confronted with it, too, where people will allege something, they get a lawyer, and what they do is come out and threaten you. And your legal counsel and your insurance people say, ‘Well, it’s going to cost you X number millions of dollars’ to defend this. And if we can settle it for this.′“Well, wait a minute. We’re not guilty. Why would we do that?′ That’s the question. Sometimes just to get rid of it, if you can get rid of it, (you) — do it.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’center_img Judging by the comments Sunday from the Texans’ Robert McNair and the Jets’ Christopher Johnson, the debate among the 32 owners could be confrontational.McNair, who last year made an analogy of inmates running the prison about players’ demonstrations during the anthem, remains adamant that everyone should stand for the “The Star-Spangled Banner.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“Our playing field is not the place for political statements, not the place for religious statements,” McNair said. “It’s the place for football.”Johnson, acting owner of the Jets with his brother, Woody, serving as ambassador to the United Kingdom, took a far different tack. Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism MOST READ Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina “I have immense respect for the players and their efforts,” Christopher Johnson said. “I think if other teams approached it like that, it would not be such a problem in the NFL.“I can’t speak to how other people run their teams, but I just think that trying to forcibly get the players to shut up is a fantastically bad idea.”While the social protests players made last season will be a topic here, reaching an agreement on language in the league’s policy regarding behavior during the anthem is highly unlikely. Owners will meet again in May in Atlanta, and with so much other business to attend in the next three days, the anthem issue figures to extend until then.“I don’t know if it’ll be a vote or just a new policy coming out,” Giants owner John Mara said. “I think we can’t go much beyond the May meeting before coming up with some sort of resolution to that.”McNair and Cowboys owner Jerry Jones are among the leaders of the move to ban any demonstrations during the anthem. McNair drew strong criticism from a variety of players after making his “inmates” comment last fall.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Shot that wouldn’t fall leads to end of Allen’s crazy career Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazillast_img read more

24 Dec

NO MOUNTAIN TOO HIGH FOR LYIT HILLWALKING CLUB

first_imgPictured above are members of the LYIT Hillwalking Club, who recently presented members of the Donegal Mountain Rescue Team (DMRT) with a cheque for €600.The money was raised during the LYIT Hillwalking Club’s Moonlight Walk which took place in November, 2014 in Glenveagh National Park.The joint initiative, between LYIT Hillwalking Club and Donegal Mountain Rescue Team was supported by Campus Engage, a national network set up to promote civic engagement as a core function of Higher Education on the island of Ireland. The LYIT Hillwalking Club hope to undertake more initiatives with the Donegal Mountain Rescue Team in the future. NO MOUNTAIN TOO HIGH FOR LYIT HILLWALKING CLUB was last modified: February 19th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more