25 Dec

Lancaster’s tall order

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Lancaster’s passing game has grown almost as fast as its receivers. The correlation is striking. “It’s been a fantastic transformation,” coach Jeff Cortez said. “They’ve grown up, worked hard, gotten stronger and more athletic over the last year and a half.” Last year, the Eagles threw for 787 yards and seven touchdowns in 12 games. This year, Eagles receivers have caught 78 passes for 878 yards and 10 touchdowns in nine games. The senior trio of Sosa, Landry and Deon Ernest has caught 62 of those passes for seven of the 10 touchdowns. “Last year, we were more like blockers with a wide receiver name,” Sosa said. “But they couldn’t stop our running game, so why pass?” Part of the transformation has to do with Lancaster’s quarterback situation. Bobby Thomas, the starter last season, was more of a running quarterback, a run-first, pass-second player perfectly suited to run Cortez’ Wing-T offense. Junior Tim Ennis, this year’s starter, is more of a pocket passer, and he has a stronger arm. “It’s a lot different than before,” senior running back Josh Gaines said. “We’ve got three receivers that I think are some of the best in the league. They’re fast, they run good routes. It’s a whole new offensive scheme this year, and the passing game has really opened things up.” The change in offensive schemes couldn’t have come at a better time for Sosa, Landry and Ernest. “Sometimes it was frustrating, because I’d be wide open, and they wouldn’t throw the ball to me,” said Landry, who caught one pass – a 20-yard touchdown – last season. “But we were winning games, so I was happy. That’s what it’s all about. “This year is completely different, though. We’re a much bigger part of the offense. They just throw the ball up, and we can go get it.” Ernest didn’t have the same kind of growth spurt as Sosa or Landry, but he also has made rapid progress. The 6-0, 140-pounder leads the team with 24 catches for 253 yards and one touchdown. He played at Lancaster until his sophomore year, then went to Desert Winds, a continuation high school, last year. “He gives the group some swagger,” Cortez said. “He’s the fastest of the three.” Sosa grew up playing with Jeremy Camacho, the standout quarterback at Eagle Rock, so he’s used to being a big part of the offense. “It was hard (last year), because I used to play with Jeremy, and we passed a lot,” he said. “It was fun, you saw a lot of action, a lot more glory. “Sometimes last year, I thought about transferring back there, but I love it at Lancaster. I’ve never had a better coaching staff. They make plays off of everybody’s different abilities. Now that we have a height advantage over everybody, everybody gives us a lot more respect.” Ramona Shelburne, (818) 713-3617 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! It didn’t happen overnight, but as growth spurts go, this one was pretty quick. Hector Sosa came to Lancaster last fall as a junior transfer from Eagle Rock High. The receiver stood 5-foot-6. By the end of the season, he was 5-9. By the end of last summer, he’d shot up to 6-3. There’s more. Sosa’s best friend is London Landry, another receiver. Landry always had been tall, but he didn’t start playing football until he was a junior. He was 6-1 at the beginning of last season. By the start of this school year, he’d grown to 6-4. last_img read more

18 Dec

The Cradle of Humankind

first_imgA handful of the world’s great cities trace their heritage to early human settlements thousands of years back. Johannesburg’s earliest residents were in the neighbourhood 3-million years ago.Forty kilometres west of Johannesburg, is a 47 000-hectare valley known as the Cradle of Humankind. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterForty kilometres west of the city, among nondescript koppies, scattered shrubs and trees, is a 47 000-hectare valley known as the Cradle of Humankind.Three million years of human activity have taken place in and around these caves, including people’s earliest-known mastery of fire, and 40% of all the world’s human ancestor fossils have been found here.The biggest and best-known of the caves is Sterkfontein, where over 500 hominid fossils and over 9 000 stone tools have been found. It was at Sterkfontein that two major finds were made, that have changed modern paleontology:The Australopithecus africanus Mrs Ples (now believed to be a Mister Ples), dating back 2.5-million years, and found by Robert Bloom in 1947.Little Foot, an almost complete ape-man skeleton that could be just over 4 million years old, the first pieces – footbones – of which were found by Ronald Clarke and Phillip Tobias in 1995 (the bones had lain in a box since the late 1970s, when they were excavated).Another major find was:A new species of hominin, homo naledi, was unveiled at Maropeng in the Cradle of Humankind near Johannesburg in September 2015. It was described as a new branch of the human family tree. Professor Lee Berger, the American archaeologist who led the excavation, called the Rising Star expedition, said fossils of 15 individuals of various ages were found 12 metres into the Dinaledi Chamber.In 1997, Clarke, digging through more boxes of bones from Sterkfontein, found more footbones from the same individual – one with a clean break suggesting that more of Little Foot’s bones might still be inside the cave. Clarke went after the rest of Little Foot’s skeleton – and in 1998, amazingly, found it, or at least a significant part of it.Maropeng brings fossils to life with interactive displays, stunning exhibits and a boat ride on an underground lake, the state-of-the-art Maropeng centre allows visitors to explore the rich fossil heritage of the Cradle of Humankind.A complete skull and fragments of arm, foot and leg bones have been uncovered so far; the rest of the bones are still being painstakingly excavated from the rock. Some believe that Little Foot is the most significant hominid find since Raymond Dart’s discovery of the skull of the Taung child, a juvenile Australopithecus africanus, discovered in 1924 near a town called Taung in the far north of North West.According to Clarke, the Little Foot fossil has yielded the most complete australopithecine skull yet found, found together with the most complete set of foot and leg bones known so far – with more extracted from the rock since then. In addition, the preservation of the skeleton is extraordinary, with most of the bones intact and joined in their natural position.The Little Foot skeleton was originally thought to be between 3 and 3.5 million years old, but a more recent study argues that it could be over 4 million years old, which would make it one of the oldest known australopithecine fossils, and easily the oldest from South Africa.According to Talk.origins: “If Clarke’s expectations of further finds are borne out, Little Foot could become the most spectacular and important hominid fossil ever discovered, rivalled only by the Turkana Boy Homo erectus skeleton [discovered in 1984 near Lake Turkana in Kenya].”The Sterkfontein valley consists of around 40 different fossil sites, 13 of which have been excavated. It includes Bolt’s Farm, where the remains of three sabre-tooth cats have been found in a pit that trapped animals; Swartkrans, site of the earliest-known deliberate use of fire, around 1.3-million years ago; Haasgat, where the fossils of early forest-dwelling monkeys, around 1.3-million years old, were found; and Gondolin, where 90 000 fossil specimens have been found since 1979. The area was declared a World Heritage Site in 1999. Although it is on privately owned land, any finds belong to the world, and the area is strictly controlled and protected.BeginningsIn the late 1890s, miners dynamited the Sterkfontein caves, searching for limestone which they converted into quick lime, an element needed for the processing of gold and the manufacture of cement. They displaced the sediment and revealed entrances to the caves. The rocks contain cyclindrical shapes – evidence of early life called stromatolite, dating back 3.8-billion years.These organisms breathed in carbon dioxide and breathed out oxygen, thus increasing the earth’s oxygen levels and leading to the evolution of other forms of life. Some 2.5-billion years ago, the area was an inland shallow sea.Over time the water evaporated and the mud formed dolomite rock, in which the stromatolite are visible. Around 2-billion years ago a large meteorite, 10 kilometres in diameter, fell in Vredefort (100 kilometres south of Sterkfontein), leaving a massive crater now known as the Vredefort Dome. The entire area for hundreds of kilometres around was covered in debris, which helped preserve the gold reefs of the Witwatersrand, preventing them from being eroded – and also helped preserve the stromatolite rocks.Some 3.5-million years ago, openings to the caves started appearing. They may have been occupied by sabre-toothed cats and other predators which would explain why the remains of large herbivores like wildebeest, extinct zebra and buffalo have been found in the caves. One of the caves is called Plover’s Lake Cave. It has been explored some 50 metres down, but beyond that point are a labyrinth of unexplored passages, and several entrances. A hyena and a porcupine are known to live there – no-one has spotted them, but their footprints are often seen. Excavations of Plover Cave and others in the area is ongoing.The nearby Wonder Cave has an enormous chamber with beautiful 15 metre-high stalactite formations. The Cave is believed to be 2.2-million years old, and bones of rodents, frogs, lizards and birds have been found in the cave. It’s hard while walking around the area to fully comprehend the age of the sites and the importance of the finds.Charles Darwin predicted in the 19th Century that the origins of humankind would be traced back to Africa because that’s where the great apes live. South Africans, and Joburgers in particular, don’t have far to go to take a stroll into life millions of years ago… so long as they are mindful of hyenas and porcupines.Updated: September 2017Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

17 Dec

Viral disease limits All American Quarter Horse Congress participation

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In an effort to protect horses and other livestock in Ohio, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is not allowing the import of horses from counties within states with confirmed and suspected cases of Vesicular Stomatitis (VSV). This restriction includes the All American Quarter Horse Congress, which is scheduled to begin in Columbus on Oct. 1.“VSV has not been detected in Ohio and we are taking every precaution possible to keep it that way,” said ODA State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey. “With the All American Quarter Horse Congress coming, we thought it was important to restrict further movement to prevent the disease’s potential spread.”VSV is a viral disease that primarily affects horses, but can also infect cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. The disease causes blister-like lesions, which burst and leave open wounds. It is extremely painful to animals and can result in the inability to eat and drink and even lameness.VSV is highly contagious, with biting insects being the most common method of transmission. Humans can also contract VSV by coming into contact with lesions, saliva, or nasal secretions from infected animals. In people, the disease causes flu-like symptoms such as fever, muscle ache, headache, and nausea.Currently, VSV has been detected in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming with confirmed or suspected cases in specific counties across those states. A current list of suspect and confirmed cases can be found in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s weekly situation report.For more information on the disease, visit the USDA’s VSV resource page.last_img read more

7 Nov

Roosters NRL Touch Premiership coaches

first_imgNRL Touch Football is excited to announce the head coaches for the Roosters 2019 NRL Touch Premiership teams.Australian Mixed Open head coach Mick Lovett will lead the female program and Youth World Cup-winning coach Dave Nolan will take the reins of the men.TFA in conjunction with our newly appointed head coaches will now start a search for suitable support staff including assistant coaches before commencing the process of selecting teams.As the current Australian Mixed Open head coach and being Melbourne-based, Mick Lovett is the logical choice to lead our Roosters women’s team. TFA looks towards ensuring a pathway for alliance coaches as well as players so there will be a focus on finding assistant coaches from our Alliance states to support these teams.Pictured below: Dave Nolan (left) and Mick Lovett (right) at the Touch Football 50th Anniversary Dinner, December 2018last_img read more

12 Oct

Iran allowed to continue advanced nuclear research

first_imgWASHINGTON — White House releases details of Iran nuclear deal amid calls for transparencyThe White House has released a summary of the deal reached between six major world powers and Iran to curb its nuclear program. Iran has denied it wants to use the program to eventually build nuclear weapons but agreed to scale it back after the international community applied strict financial sanctions.It allows Iran to continue research and development on its nuclear centrifuge technology, announcing the conclusion of technical talks on the implementation of an interim deal pausing Iran’s nuclear program. The deal, signed  in Geneva in November, is to go into effect on Monday and to last for six months while Iran and the P5+1 – the United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China and Germany – attempt to negotiate a comprehensive agreement to end the long-standing crisis.The agreement is seeking to hold the most advanced parts of Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for an easing of western economic sanctions on Iran. Iran has accepted to halt 20 percent of enriched uranium until January 20 and start diluting half of its uranium stock of which 20% was already enriched, according to the deal.The White House summary said a “Joint Commission” had been established by experts from Iran, P5+1 countries and the EU as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to monitor the implementation of the agreement. Some of the limited and temporary easing of sanctions against Iran will include the release of $6 billion in relief which is a small part of total $100 billion that will still be restricted.The Undersecretary of the US Secretary of State Wendy Sherman has informed the lawmakers regarding the details in a closed meeting. Some congress members said the plan is already increasing their concerns. Republican senator Lindsey Graham, known as the most critical of Obama administration’s foreign policy claimed “I am more worried than ever after the briefing,” IAAE has asked to keep the technical details secret, according to White House spokesman Jim Carney.last_img read more

28 Sep

Did The Referees Ruin The Mens NCAA Championship

FiveThirtyEight More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Embed Code Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (Apr. 4, 2017), we say goodbye to March Madness and break down the women’s and men’s NCAA championship games. Next, we investigate why NBA teams are resting their players early and often. Plus, a significant digit on Madison Bumgarner.FiveThirtyEight’s Benjamin Morris argues that Mississippi State earned every bit of their upset over UConn.Mississippi State ultimately lost the women’s championship game to South Carolina.Neil Paine notes that even though the men’s championship was tough to watch, UNC played ugly enough to win.That was not a good national title game, writes ESPN’s Myron Medcalf.The Ringer’s Rodger Sherman says it wasn’t UNC players who won the night — it was the referees.NBA teams are resting players earlier and earlier, Todd Whitehead writes for FiveThirtyEight.Significant Digit: 16.5, the average number of at-bats that San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner takes between hitting home runs, since 2014. Last Sunday, Bumgarner hit two home runs and became the first pitcher to hit more than one on Opening Day. read more

28 Sep

Nearly Every Team Is Playing Like The Rockets And Thats Hurting The

During that 2016-17 season, though, five other teams exceeded the Moreyball Rate of the 2015-16 Golden State Warriors, who had the highest non-Rockets Moreyball Rate of any team from 2012 through 2016. That incredible jump from one-sixth of the league foreshadowed what has happened since: The league’s Moreyball Rate has been rising far faster than it did during the McHale years, meaning that the Rockets’ math advantage is once again shrinking, through no fault of their own offensive priorities.While the average Moreyball Rate jumped only 3.7 percentage points from 2012 (58.1 percent) through 2016 (60.8 percent), it has rocketed (pun very much intended) all the way up to 68.3 percent in 2019. That’s a jump of 7.5 percentage points in just three seasons, compared with the four it took to erase a smaller advantage for the previous incarnation of the Rockets. And at the same time that the NBA’s average Moreyball Rate has shot through the roof, the Rockets themselves have once again stalled out. They appear to have hit a ceiling in terms of how many of their shots can really be taken from the most efficient areas of the floor.Houston’s sky-high Moreyball Rates during the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons helped them to two of the most efficient offensive seasons in NBA history. During that 2016-17 campaign, the Rockets registered the 10th-best offensive efficiency in NBA history, per Basketball-Reference. During the 2017-18 season, they posted the 11th-best offensive efficiency in history. And during both seasons, the Rockets led the NBA in Moreyball Rate by a healthy margin, even while the league as a whole was catching up.This year, however, they don’t even lead the league in Moreyball Rate, marking the first time since the 2011-12 campaign that they’ve fallen out of first place. (They’ve been passed by Mike Budenholzer’s Milwaukee Bucks, who are at 82.6 percent, the highest figure that can be gleaned from the shot location data in NBA.com’s database, which reaches back to the 1996-97 season.) Amazingly, Houston’s Morey+ this season has already dropped below where it was during the 2015-16 season that inspired Morey to bring in D’Antoni in the first place. And even while they’ve cleaned up their defense a bit these past two years, the rate at which leaguewide Moreyball Rates are spiking has left their Moreyball Advantage at the lowest point it’s been in years.It seems unlikely that other NBA teams will simply stop pursuing shots from the Moreyball areas of the floor, so the league average will presumably continue to rise — if not necessarily at quite the rate it has these past few years. And with the Rockets having seemingly maxed out their own Moreyball Rates in the low 80s, it looks like the best way for them to regain the sky-high Moreyball Advantage they had in the early 2010s is by engineering their defense so that opponents simply can’t access the most efficient areas of the floor. But that’s also what every other team in the league has been trying to do to the Rockets for years, and as they’ve been showing us for quite some time now, it’s easier said than done. By attempting so many more of their shots from the most efficient areas of the floor than any other team, the Rockets created for themselves a healthy math advantage. Through shot selection alone, they essentially began each game with a small lead that their opponents needed to erase in addition to out-scoring them over the course of 48 minutes in order to win the game.For the next three seasons under Kevin McHale, however, the Rockets’ Moreyball Rate stayed fairly stagnant. They still led the NBA in Moreyball Rate during each of those seasons, but they did so with rates that hovered between 72.6 and 73.8 percent. At the same time, the league average Moreyball Rate crept upward, eating into the Rockets’ math advantage and, by extension, that small de facto lead with which they began every game.This is perhaps best exemplified by scaling their Moreyball Rate against the league average. Fans familiar with baseball statistics like OPS+ will recognize this formula: The NBA average Moreyball Rate is given a score of 100, while a team whose Moreyball Rate is 10 percent better than league average receives a Morey+ score of 110, and a team whose Moreyball Rate is 10 percent worse than league average receives a Morey+ score of 90. So, in a world where the league average Moreyball Rate is 50 percent, a team with a 55 percent Moreyball Rate has a Morey+ of 110, while a team with a 45 percent Moreyball Rate has a Morey+ of 90.Using the same formula, we can calculate that during the 2012-13 season when the Rockets had a Moreyball Rate of 73.6 percent against a league average of 57.1 percent, they had a Morey+ of 129.1, meaning they attempted shots in the restricted area or from three-point territory at a rate 29.1 percent higher than that of the average NBA team. That is a ridiculously high mark. But it was also essentially the high-water mark for the McHale-era Rockets, whose Morey+ plummeted over the next few seasons, though not through any offensive fault of their own.At the same time the Rockets’ math advantage on offense was shrinking, the same thing was happening on the defensive end of the court. During that 2012-13 campaign, the Rockets did an excellent job of limiting their opponents’ attempts from the Moreyball areas of the floor. Slowly but surely, however, they ended up yielding better and better shots, and their opponents’ Moreyball Rate crept upward at an even faster rate than the league average.The decline of the Rockets’ math advantage during that time looks even starker when pitting their offense and defense against each other. At the same time as they were shooting 29.1 percent more often from Moreyball areas than the average team in 2012-13, they were forcing opponents to shoot from those areas 3.2 percent less often than the average squad. Add those two numbers up, and the Rockets had a Moreyball Advantage of 32.2 points during that season. By the time they got to the 2015-16 campaign, however, their Moreyball Advantage had been cut by more than half (to 13.8 points).During those four years, the Rockets were the only team to have a Moreyball Rate above 68.8 percent, but the average team still gained steadily gained on them, and their ability to prevent their own opponents from getting to Moreyball areas declined as well. And it was then that Morey decided to hire Mike D’Antoni. Because if the Rockets couldn’t stop the rest of the league from following their lead in following The Math, then the next-best option was for them to take The Math to new heights.In D’Antoni’s first season, the Rockets had a Moreyball Rate of 81.8 percent, blasting the previous league highs they’d set over the prior few seasons. That 81.8 percent figure was, obviously, the highest in the NBA by far, making it the fifth consecutive season during which the Rockets led the league. Crucially, that rate bumped their Morey+ all the way back up to 128.8 — almost all the way back to where it was during that 2012-13 campaign, when the Rockets first began truly orienting their offense around The Math. Morey+ score* for the Houston Rockets 2018-19119.8– Winners of five straight games, the Houston Rockets nudged their record back up to their season-high mark of two games over .500 (16-14) with a blowout win over the Washington Wizards on Wednesday night, during which they set an NBA record by making 26 3-pointers. Despite this hot streak, however, it’s still fair to say that the Rockets have not performed as expected thus far this season. When searching for reasons why that might be the case, the focus has often been on their inability to replicate last season’s switch-happy defense or the early-season injuries and suspensions they had to weather or their general offensive malaise. (If ranking fifth in offensive efficiency can be described as a malaise.) But the root of Houston’s issues may actually just be that the rest of the league is increasingly subscribing to Houston’s core beliefs, which has eaten into the team’s math advantage.To fully understand what that means and how that’s happened, we need to back up a bit. Daryl Morey has been the general manager of the Rockets since 2007, but it wasn’t until the 2012-13 season that the purest form of Morey’s basketball philosophies truly began to shine through on the floor.Coming off three consecutive non-playoff seasons and having just traded for James Harden, the Rockets re-engineered their offense to play not only to their new star’s strengths, but also to The Math. It was during that season that the Rockets began their maniacal pursuit of the most efficient shot on every single possession, turning their collective backs on years of NBA tradition by eschewing the lost art of the mid-range jumper whenever possible in favor of attempts either at the rim or behind the three-point line.It’s easy to see the benefits of that offensive strategy now — six years after the Rockets took it to what then seemed like its logical extreme — but at the time, it was not yet really accepted that this was a healthy way to construct an offense. Not everybody believed in The Math. The Rockets did, however, and they did to a degree that was then unheard of in league history.During that 2012-13 campaign, the Rockets attempted 73.6 percent of their shots from either the restricted area or three-point range, per NBA.com. (For the balance of this piece, we’ll refer to this percentage as a team’s “Moreyball Rate,” in keeping with certain segments of the basketball analytics community.) The next closest team was the Denver Nuggets at 67.4 percent, while the average NBA team had a Moreyball Rate of 57.1 percent. SeasonMorey+ score 2012-13129.1– * A rating where 100 equals the NBA average and every point above or below 100 equals a one percent change (up or down). 2013-14124.8– 2017-18126.1– 2015-16120.1– 2016-17128.8– 2014-15125.3– read more

28 Sep

No need for Buckeyes to panic

This was supposed to be the year of eight for the Ohio State football team. The team seemingly had all the pieces to go 12-0 during the regular season and win the school’s eighth national championship. Quarterback Terrelle Pryor would also become OSU’s eighth recipient of the Heisman Trophy, thrusting him into Buckeye lore. Then, after the Buckeyes were beaten and battered by Wisconsin Saturday night, most fans gave up hope on the season. Everyone together now, take a deep breath. Through seven weeks of the season, three teams have ascended to the No. 1 ranking (Alabama, OSU and now Oregon). Verdict? No dominant college football team exists in 2010. Here’s a rundown of what the apparent national title contenders face the rest of the season. Oregon still has to play at Southern California, home versus Washington, home against No. 18 Arizona (who has already beaten Iowa) and at Oregon State. Its defense has put up good numbers but hasn’t faced a team as physical as USC or a quarterback with the shake-and-bake of Washington’s Jake Locker. No. 2 Oklahoma travels to No. 18 Missouri and No. 17 Oklahoma State before its regular season ends. It’ll likely face Missouri or No. 14 Nebraska in the Big 12 title game. The Sooner defense gave up 24 points to lowly Utah State and 351 rushing yards to Air Force. It isn’t going undefeated with a cupcake defense. After they face each other next week, all No. 5 Auburn and No. 6 LSU have to do is take on No. 7 Alabama, as well as the SEC East winner in the SEC championship game. Auburn gave up 332 yards passing and four touchdowns to Arkansas’ backup quarterback last weekend — in a little more than one half. LSU can’t decide who its quarterback is. Enough said. There will be a mid-major elimination game on Nov. 6 as No. 9 Utah and No. 4 TCU square off. The loser of the game is immediately eliminated from the title picture, and the winner isn’t guaranteed anything even if it doesn’t lose a game. Although it’s already beaten Wisconsin and won’t have to play OSU, I’m not sold on No. 8 Michigan State. One, it hasn’t played a game outside the state of Michigan yet. Two, it travels to No. 13 Iowa a week from Saturday. If the Spartans are still undefeated in two weeks, go ahead and crown them. The only team that will go untested the rest of the season is No. 2 Boise State. With that being said, a lot has to go right for OSU to re-enter the national title picture. On the other hand, the 2010 college football season is a masterpiece that is far from finished. And if recent history in college football has taught us anything, it is to expect the unexpected in a season with no clear-cut top team. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the chaos of the 2007 college football season. Week One: Appalachian State stuns No. 5 Michigan in the Big House. Week Five: No. 3 Oklahoma and No. 4 Florida lose to unranked Colorado and Auburn. Week Six: No. 2 USC loses at home to 41-point underdog Stanford. Week Seven: OSU and South Florida rise to No. 1 and No. 2 after previous No. 1 and No. 2, LSU and Cal, lose to division foes. Week Eight: South Florida’s stay at No. 2 is short as it falls to Rutgers. Week 10: New No. 2 Boston College falls to unranked Florida State. Week 11: OSU suffers embarrassing loss on Senior Day to Illinois. Week 12: Not only is No. 2 Oregon defeated by Arizona, but it loses its quarterback, likely Heisman winner quarterback Dennis Dixon, to a season-ending injury while No. 4 Oklahoma is beaten by Texas Tech. Week: 13: No. 1 LSU is topped by Arkansas in a wild triple-overtime loss, and No. 4 Missouri beats No. 2 Kansas to move within one win of playing for the school’s first national championship. Week 14: No. 1 Missouri and No. 2 West Virginia choke in the final week of the season, giving rise to No. 1 OSU and No. 2 LSU, which ended up being the first national champion with two losses. The Buckeyes need to win their remaining games, preferably quite handily, to stand any chance. Furthermore, they need a ton of help. I’m convinced Oklahoma, Oregon and Michigan State will each lose at least once. It would help OSU tremendously if Oklahoma and Oregon lost twice. Then, OSU needs the three SEC West teams to take each other out and produce only one one-loss team. Utah and TCU also both need to lose. If all of that shakes out, and depending on the voters, OSU might stumble upon another national champion game berth against an SEC team. Far-fetched? Yes. Impossible? No. As college football fans are well-aware of by now, nothing’s impossible with the BCS. read more

28 Sep

Former Ohio State mens soccer player Chris Hegngi drafted by Portland Timbers

Former Ohio State men’s soccer standout Chris Hegngi was drafted No. 22 in the Major League Soccer (MLS) Supplemental Draft by the Portland Timbers. The forward, who was drafted Jan. 22, scored 18 goals during his career and was second on the team with nine points last season. A four year letterman, Hegngi started every game his freshman year and all but two his second season at OSU. The star forward tallied three goals and four assists in each of his first two years for the Buckeyes. Despite the successes of his early career in Columbus, it wasn’t until his junior year that Hegngi might have started to show his worth. Scoring nine goals and starting every game, Hegngi was voted MVP of the team by his teammates his junior year and was showered with accolades, including being named second team NSCAA All-Region and the Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year. His 6-foot-2, 180 pound frame made him a prime target heading into his senior season for any MLS clubs looking to add a big man up front. A disappointing senior season where Hegngi only scored 3 goals and added 3 assists, however, caused him to fall off most teams’ radars. Hegngi was passed up in the MLS Super Draft, but eventually the Portland Timbers selected him in the later Supplemental Draft. The Timbers might need a physical presence that could help them improve on their atrocious offensive performance from a year ago, when they finished the season with a 8-10-16 record and an average of only 1 point per game, leaving them second last in their conference. Finishing near the bottom of the Western Conference in 2012, the Timbers only found the back of the net 34 times, the second lowest total in the league. Having come up through the ranks of the D.C. United Youth Academy and played for his high school before arriving at OSU, Hegngi has years of experience that could help him find a position on the final roster for the Timbers. With the selection, Hegngi joins other former Buckeyes in the professional ranks. He joins the ranks of former stars Matt Lampson, a current Columbus Crew player, and Roger Espinoza, a current Wigan Athletic player in the English Premier League, to leave OSU with hopes of succeeding in the MLS. read more

18 Sep

Simone Inzaghi gutted with Lazios display

first_imgSimone Inzaghi admitted he was livid with the performance of Lazio players in what he described as the worst half he has ever experienced at the club.Sergio Pellissier opened the scoring at the Stadio Bentegodi before Ciro Immobile grabbed the equaliser that sealed a point for Lazio leaving them in fifth place.“We could not have done worse than the first half. I told the lads that we had completely the wrong attitude, had to take responsibility and it was the worst first half I’d seen in my three years in this job,” Inzaghi told Football Italia.SS Lazio v AS Roma - TIM CupMatch Preview: SS Lazio vs AS Roma Boro Tanchev – August 31, 2019 Lazio will host Roma to the Olimpico Stadium in the first Derby della Capitale of the 2019-20 Serie A campaign.“I wanted to replace all 11 players at half-time, but seeing as I couldn’t, I had to ask them to put in a different performance. I take my share of the responsibility too, but I expected more from my team.“At the end of the 90 minutes, perhaps we deserved more from the game and three draws in a row is starting to become a concern. For the first time this season, we are not in the top four.”last_img read more